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Videos uploaded by user “Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)”
Vision-free MIT Cheetah
 
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MIT's Cheetah 3 robot can now leap and gallop across rough terrain, climb a staircase littered with debris, and quickly recover its balance when suddenly yanked or shoved, all while essentially blind. Learn more: http://news.mit.edu/2018/blind-cheetah-robot-climb-stairs-obstacles-disaster-zones-0705 Watch more videos from MIT: http://www.youtube.com/user/MITNewsOffice?sub_confirmation=1 The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is an independent, coeducational, privately endowed university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Our mission is to advance knowledge; to educate students in science, engineering, and technology; and to tackle the most pressing problems facing the world today. We are a community of hands-on problem-solvers in love with fundamental science and eager to make the world a better place. The MIT YouTube channel features videos about all types of MIT research, including the robot cheetah, LIGO, gravitational waves, mathematics, and bombardier beetles, as well as videos on origami, time capsules, and other aspects of life and culture on the MIT campus. Our goal is to open the doors of MIT and bring the Institute to the world through video.
MIT cheetah robot lands the running jump
 
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In a leap for robotic development, the MIT researchers who built a robotic cheetah have now trained it to see and jump over hurdles as it runs — making this the first four-legged robot to run and jump over obstacles autonomously. (Learn more: http://bit.ly/1JYy1bD) Watch the MIT cheetah run outside: http://youtu.be/XMKQbqnXXhQ Video: Haewon Park, Patrick Wensing and Sangbae Kim
Engineering a second skin
 
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Scientists at MIT, Massachusetts General Hospital, Living Proof, and Olivo Labs have developed a new material that can temporarily protect and tighten skin, and smooth wrinkles. With further development, it could also be used to deliver drugs to help treat skin conditions such as eczema and other types of dermatitis. (Learn more: http://mitsha.re/4bKe3002OEA) Video: Melanie Gonick/MIT XPL face footage courtesy of: Olivo Labs, LLC. XPL animation courtesy of: Olivo Labs, LLC. Music sampled from, "Subdivision of the Masses" by Philipp Weigl http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Philipp_Weigl/Sound-trax/Subdivision_of_the_Masses http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Autonomous robotic plane flies indoors at MIT
 
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For decades, academic and industry researchers have been working on control algorithms for autonomous helicopters — robotic helicopters that pilot themselves, rather than requiring remote human guidance. Dozens of research teams have competed in a series of autonomous-helicopter challenges posed by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI); progress has been so rapid that the last two challenges have involved indoor navigation without the use of GPS. But MIT's Robust Robotics Group — which fielded the team that won the last AUVSI contest — has set itself an even tougher challenge: developing autonomous-control algorithms for the indoor flight of GPS-denied airplanes. At the 2011 International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), a team of researchers from the group described an algorithm for calculating a plane's trajectory; in 2012, at the same conference, they presented an algorithm for determining its "state" — its location, physical orientation, velocity and acceleration. Now, the MIT researchers have completed a series of flight tests in which an autonomous robotic plane running their state-estimation algorithm successfully threaded its way among pillars in the parking garage under MIT's Stata Center. Read more: http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2012/autonomous-robotic-plane-flies-indoors-0810.html Video: Melanie Gonick, MIT News Additional footage courtesy of: Adam Bry, Nicholas Roy, Abraham Bachrach of the Robust Robotics Group, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Special thanks to the Office of Naval Research under MURI N00014-09-1-1052 and the Army Research Office under the Micro Autonomous System Technologies program.
MIT Students Write Pi
 
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In honor of Pi Day we asked MIT students to write as many digits of π from memory. Watch more videos from MIT: http://www.youtube.com/user/MITNewsOffice?sub_confirmation=1 The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is an independent, coeducational, privately endowed university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Our mission is to advance knowledge; to educate students in science, engineering, and technology; and to tackle the most pressing problems facing the world today. We are a community of hands-on problem-solvers in love with fundamental science and eager to make the world a better place. The MIT YouTube channel features videos about all types of MIT research, including the robot cheetah, LIGO, gravitational waves, mathematics, and bombardier beetles, as well as videos on origami, time capsules, and other aspects of life and culture on the MIT campus. Our goal is to open the doors of MIT and bring the Institute to the world through video.
One step closer to fusion power
 
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For the first time, researchers show two types of turbulence within plasma that cause significant heat loss. Solving this problem could take the world a step closer to fusion power which has the promise of limitless and relatively clean energy. (Learn more: http://mitsha.re/XmrC3) Video produced and edited: Melanie Gonick/MIT Plasma simulations and Alcator C-Mod footage: Nathan Howard/MIT PSFC and J. Candy/General Atomics Stock media provided by Pond5.com Music sampled from "Rewound" by Chris Zabriskie http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Chr... http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...
Soft autonomous earthworm robot at MIT
 
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Earthworms creep along the ground by alternately squeezing and stretching muscles along the length of their bodies, inching forward with each wave of contractions. Snails and sea cucumbers also use this mechanism, called peristalsis, to get around, and our own gastrointestinal tracts operate by a similar action, squeezing muscles along the esophagus to push food to the stomach. Now researchers at MIT, Harvard University and Seoul National University have engineered a soft autonomous robot that moves via peristalsis, crawling across surfaces by contracting segments of its body, much like an earthworm. The robot, made almost entirely of soft materials, is remarkably resilient: Even when stepped upon or bludgeoned with a hammer, the robot is able to inch away, unscathed. Sangbae Kim, the Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at MIT, says such a soft robot may be useful for navigating rough terrain or squeezing through tight spaces. Read more: http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2012/autonomous-earthworm-robot-0810.html Video produced and edited by Melanie Gonick/MIT Additional footage: Sangbae Kim
MIT Campaign for a Better World
 
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At MIT, we pursue research, education, and innovation with a passion for serious impact. We have a record of transforming society for the better—and we are just getting started. As we look to the horizon, we see a future of important challenges and inspiring opportunities. With your help, we can build a better world. (Learn more about the MIT Campaign for a Better World: http://betterworld.mit.edu/)
LIGO Detects Gravitational Waves
 
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After a decades-long quest, The MIT-Caltech collaboration LIGO Laboratories has detected gravitational waves, opening a new era in our exploration of the universe. Read more: http://news.mit.edu/2016/ligo-first-detection-gravitational-waves-0211 Produced by MIT Video Productions and MIT News Office Producer/Editor: Bill Lattanzi Footage courtesy of: Hans Peter Bischof; California Institute of Technology; Jet Propulsion Laboratory; LIGO, A Passion for Understanding, by Kai Staats; MIT; National Science Foundation; Roger Smith; Virginia Trimble, widow of Joseph Weber; Wikipedia Commons
Explained: Optogenetics
 
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Associate Professor of Biological Engineering and Brain and Cognitive Sciences Ed Boyden explains optogenetics and how it is used in neurological research. Video: Emily Heusted
A new approach to water desalination
 
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The availability of fresh water is dwindling in many parts of the world, a problem that is expected to grow with populations. One promising source of potable water is the world's virtually limitless supply of seawater, but so far desalination technology has been too expensive for widespread use. Now, MIT researchers have come up with a new approach using a different kind of filtration material: sheets of graphene, a one-atom-thick form of the element carbon, which they say can be far more efficient and possibly less expensive than existing desalination systems. Read more at MIT News: http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2012/graphene-water-desalination-0702.html Images courtesy David Cohen-Tanugi; Brett Coulstock; NASA; Ryan Lackey; and James Grellier.
Muscles made of nylon
 
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MIT researchers have come up with one of the simplest and lowest-cost systems yet for developing artificial muscles, in which a material reproduces some of the bending motions that natural muscle tissues perform. The key ingredient? Nylon fiber. (Learn more: http://news.mit.edu/2016/nylon-muscle-fibers-1123) Watch more videos from MIT: http://www.youtube.com/user/MITNewsOffice?sub_confirmation=1 The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is an independent, coeducational, privately endowed university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Our mission is to advance knowledge; to educate students in science, engineering, and technology; and to tackle the most pressing problems facing the world today. We are a community of hands-on problem-solvers in love with fundamental science and eager to make the world a better place. The MIT YouTube channel features videos about all types of MIT research, including the robot cheetah, LIGO, gravitational waves, mathematics, and bombardier beetles, as well as videos on origami, time capsules, and other aspects of life and culture on the MIT campus. Our goal is to open the doors of MIT and bring the Institute to the world through video. Video: Melanie Gonick/MIT Artificial muscles footage: Seyed M. Mirvakili/Ian W. Hunter Additional footage: Pond5 Music sampled from, "Divider," by Chris Zabriskie http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Chris_Zabriskie/Divider/06_-_Divider https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Magnetic shape-shifters
 
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MIT engineers have created soft, magnetic 3-D-printed structures that can transform their shape almost instantaneously by the wave of a magnet. The structures are flexible, yet strong and could be used to develop remotely controlled biomedical devices. (Learn more: http://news.mit.edu/2018/magnetic-3-d-printed-structures-crawl-roll-jump-play-catch-0613 Watch more videos from MIT: http://www.youtube.com/user/MITNewsOffice?sub_confirmation=1 The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is an independent, coeducational, privately endowed university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Our mission is to advance knowledge; to educate students in science, engineering, and technology; and to tackle the most pressing problems facing the world today. We are a community of hands-on problem-solvers in love with fundamental science and eager to make the world a better place. The MIT YouTube channel features videos about all types of MIT research, including the robot cheetah, LIGO, gravitational waves, mathematics, and bombardier beetles, as well as videos on origami, time capsules, and other aspects of life and culture on the MIT campus. Our goal is to open the doors of MIT and bring the Institute to the world through video.
New hydrogel that doesn't dry out
 
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Engineers at MIT have found a way to prevent hydrogels from dehydrating, with a method that binds hydrogels to elastomers such as rubber and silicone. (Learn more: http://news.mit.edu/2016/tough-hydrogel-hybrid-artificial-skin-0627) Video: Melanie Gonick/MIT Additional demo footage: Hyunwoo Yuk Skin layers animation: Pond5.com
New method removes micropollutants from water
 
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A team of MIT researchers has developed a new way to clear pollutants from water, even when present in extremely low concentrations. (Learn more about their novel method: http://news.mit.edu/2017/electrochemical-clear-pollutants-water-0510) Watch more videos from MIT: http://www.youtube.com/user/MITNewsOffice?sub_confirmation=1 The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is an independent, coeducational, privately endowed university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Our mission is to advance knowledge; to educate students in science, engineering, and technology; and to tackle the most pressing problems facing the world today. We are a community of hands-on problem-solvers in love with fundamental science and eager to make the world a better place. The MIT YouTube channel features videos about all types of MIT research, including the robot cheetah, LIGO, gravitational waves, mathematics, and bombardier beetles, as well as videos on origami, time capsules, and other aspects of life and culture on the MIT campus. Our goal is to open the doors of MIT and bring the Institute to the world through video. Video: Melanie Gonick/MIT Electrode images: Felice Frankel
Light-based therapy for Alzheimer's disease
 
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Researchers in Li-Huei Tsai's laboratory at the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory have shown that disrupted gamma waves in the brains of mice with Alzheimer’s disease can be corrected by a unique non-invasive technique using flickering light. (Learn more: http://news.mit.edu/2016/visual-stimulation-treatment-alzheimer-1207) Tsai Lab: http://tsailaboratory.mit.edu/ Watch more videos from MIT: http://www.youtube.com/user/MITNewsOffice?sub_confirmation=1 The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is an independent, coeducational, privately endowed university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Our mission is to advance knowledge; to educate students in science, engineering, and technology; and to tackle the most pressing problems facing the world today. We are a community of hands-on problem-solvers in love with fundamental science and eager to make the world a better place. The MIT YouTube channel features videos about all types of MIT research, including the robot cheetah, LIGO, gravitational waves, mathematics, and bombardier beetles, as well as videos on origami, time capsules, and other aspects of life and culture on the MIT campus. Our goal is to open the doors of MIT and bring the Institute to the world through video. Video: Picower Institute for Learning and Memory Animation: Sputnik Animation Additional footage and music: Pond5
LiquiGlide: Nonstick coatings leave zero waste behind
 
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The days of wasting condiments — and other products — that stick stubbornly to the sides of their bottles may be gone, thanks to MIT spinout LiquiGlide, which has licensed its nonstick coating to a major consumer-goods company. (Learn more about LiquiGlide: http://mitne.ws/1BTLIqK) Developed in 2009 by MIT’s Kripa Varanasi and David Smith, LiquiGlide is a liquid-impregnated coating that acts as a slippery barrier between a surface and a viscous liquid. Applied inside a condiment bottle, for instance, the coating clings permanently to its sides, while allowing the condiment to glide off completely, with no residue. They can also design the coatings to be made entirely of food so it's edible and safe for consumer packaging of food-based products Video: Melanie Gonick/MIT Additional footage courtesy of LiquiGlide™ Music sampled from "Candlepower" by Chris Zabriskie https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Chris_Zabriskie/Divider/02_-_Candlepower http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Rainfall can release aerosols, high-speed video shows
 
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Using high-speed cameras, MIT researchers observed that when a raindrop hits a surface, it traps tiny air bubbles at the point of contact. As in a glass of champagne, the bubbles then shoot upward, ultimately bursting from the drop in a fizz of aerosols. (Learn more: http://bit.ly/1wZYXy5) The researchers suspect that in natural environments, aerosols may carry aromatic elements, along with bacteria and viruses stored in soil. These aerosols may be released during light or moderate rainfall, and then spread via gusts of wind. Video produced and edited by Melanie Gonick/MIT High-speed droplet footage by Youngsoo Joung Rain falling and bubbles in glass footage: Pond5.com Music sampled from "Running Waters" by Jason Shaw http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Jason_Shaw/Audionautix_Acoustic/RUNNING_WATERS______________2-46 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/
Newly engineered water superglue
 
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MIT engineers have developed a method to make synthetic, sticky hydrogel that is more than 90 percent water. The hydrogel, which is a transparent, rubber-like material, can adhere to surfaces with a toughness comparable to the bond between tendon and cartilage on bone. (Learn more: http://mitsha.re/UqdR3) Video produced and edited by Melanie Gonick/MIT Demo clips courtesy of: Hyunwook Yuk, Teng Zhang, Shaoting Lin, German Alberto Parada and Xuanhe Zhao Thumbnail image: Felice Frankel
Robot with human reflexes
 
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Researchers from MIT's Department of Mechanical Engineering have designed an interface that takes advantage of a human's split-second reflexes allowing a humanoid to maintain its balance and complete tasks. (Learn more: http://mitne.ws/1WyzOtq) Video: Melanie Gonick/MIT Additional footage courtesy of the researchers
Robot Origami: Robot self-folds, walks, and completes tasks
 
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A team of MIT researchers have developed a printable origami robot that folds itself up from a flat sheet of plastic when heated and measures about a centimeter from front to back. (Learn more: http://mitne.ws/1HwBZro) Weighing only a third of a gram, the robot can swim, climb an incline, traverse rough terrain, and carry a load twice its weight. Video: Melanie Gonick/MIT Additional footage: Shuhei Miyashita Music sampled from "Master" by Blue Dot Sessions http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Blue_Dot_Sessions/Modul_Kalimba/Master_1659 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Stretchable hydrogel electronics
 
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Previously, MIT engineers developed a hydrogel made of over 90% water. Now, they've developed a way to incorporate electronics into the hydrogel which could bridge the gap between the human body and electronics. (Learn more: http://mitsha.re/VzEqF) Video: Melanie Gonick/MIT Hydrogel demo clips: Shaoting Lin and Hyunwoo Yuk
MIT Media Lab: 3-D printing with variable densities
 
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MIT Media Lab researchers Steven Keating and Neri Oxman demonstrate some of their work into 3-D printing. Read more about MIT's work around 3-D printing: http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2011/3d-printing-0914.html Video: Melanie Gonick, MIT News
Are musical tastes cultural or hardwired in the brain?
 
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A new study out of MIT and Brandeis University suggests musical preferences are cultural in origin and not hardwired in the brain. (Learn more: http://mitsha.re/G24M302dDA9) Video: Melanie Gonick/MIT Still images: Josh McDermott and Alan Schultz Audio of Tsimane' female singing: Josh McDermott Audio files for experiments: Josh McDermott Stock imagery courtesy of Pond5.com adapted by Melanie Gonick Music sampled from, "Avec Toi" by Dana Boulé http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Dana_Boule/Blue_Piano_1544/Avec_Toi http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
A new way to mix oil and water
 
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A team of researchers in the Varanasi Lab at MIT has developed a way to create nanoscale emulsions, of oil and water, stable enough to last indefinitely, and with no mixing required. (Learn more: http://news.mit.edu/2017/new-way-mix-oil-and-water-1108) Watch more videos from MIT: http://www.youtube.com/user/MITNewsOffice?sub_confirmation=1 The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is an independent, coeducational, privately endowed university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Our mission is to advance knowledge; to educate students in science, engineering, and technology; and to tackle the most pressing problems facing the world today. We are a community of hands-on problem-solvers in love with fundamental science and eager to make the world a better place. The MIT YouTube channel features videos about all types of MIT research, including the robot cheetah, LIGO, gravitational waves, mathematics, and bombardier beetles, as well as videos on origami, time capsules, and other aspects of life and culture on the MIT campus. Our goal is to open the doors of MIT and bring the Institute to the world through video. Video: Melanie Gonick/MIT Additional imagery: Varanasi Lab at MIT
(Tiny) Reconfigurable Robots at MIT
 
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The device doesn't look like much: a caterpillar-sized assembly of metal rings and strips resembling something you might find buried in a home-workshop drawer. But the technology behind it, and the long-range possibilities it represents, are quite remarkable. The little device is called a milli-motein — a name melding its millimeter-sized components and a motorized design inspired by proteins, which naturally fold themselves into incredibly complex shapes. This minuscule robot may be a harbinger of future devices that could fold themselves up into almost any shape imaginable. The device was conceived by Neil Gershenfeld, head of MIT's Center for Bits and Atoms, visiting scientist Ara Knaian and graduate student Kenneth Cheung, and is described in a paper presented recently at the 2012 Intelligent Robots and Systems conference. Its key feature, Gershenfeld says: "It's effectively a one-dimensional robot that can be made in a continuous strip, without conventionally moving parts, and then folded into arbitrary shapes." Read more at MIT News: http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2012/reconfigurable-robots-turn-into-anything-1130.html Image credits: MIT Center for Bits and Atoms/Ara Knaian/Jonathan Bachrach.
Jet-injected drugs may mean the end of needles
 
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Getting a shot at the doctor's office may become less painful in the not-too-distant future. MIT researchers have engineered a device that delivers a tiny, high-pressure jet of medicine through the skin without the use of a hypodermic needle. The device can be programmed to deliver a range of doses to various depths — an improvement over similar jet-injection systems that are now commercially available. Read more at MIT News: http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2012/needleless-injections-0524.html
Bamboo Engineering
 
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MIT scientists, along with architects and wood processors from England and Canada, are looking for ways to turn bamboo into a construction material more akin to wood composites, like plywood. (Learn more: http://bit.ly/WCNN7e) Such bamboo products are currently being developed by several companies; the MIT project, lead by professor Lorna Gibson, intends to gain a better understanding of these materials, so that bamboo can be more effectively used. Video: Melanie Gonick, MIT News Additional footage courtesy of MyBoringChannel and Frank Ross (http://myboringchannel.com/) Music sampled from: Radio Silence (http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Schemawound/TRANCOUNT/03_Radio_Silence) Artist/Composer: Schemawound http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Schemawound/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/legalcode
Plant-to-human communication
 
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MIT engineers have transformed spinach plants into sensors that can detect explosives and wirelessly relay that information to a handheld device similar to a smartphone. (Learn more: http://news.mit.edu/2016/nanobionic-spinach-plants-detect-explosives-1031) Watch more videos from MIT: http://www.youtube.com/user/MITNewsOffice?sub_confirmation=1 The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is an independent, coeducational, privately endowed university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Our mission is to advance knowledge; to educate students in science, engineering, and technology; and to tackle the most pressing problems facing the world today. We are a community of hands-on problem-solvers in love with fundamental science and eager to make the world a better place. The MIT YouTube channel features videos about all types of MIT research, including the robot cheetah, LIGO, gravitational waves, mathematics, and bombardier beetles, as well as videos on origami, time capsules, and other aspects of life and culture on the MIT campus. Our goal is to open the doors of MIT and bring the Institute to the world through video. Video: Melanie Gonick/MIT Infrared/fluorescent images: Min Hao Wong
Rainer Weiss wins Nobel Prize in physics
 
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Rainer Weiss, professor emeritus of physics at MIT, has won the Nobel Prize in physics for 2017. Weiss shares the award with Caltech professors emeritus of physics Barry Barish and Kip Thorne. In this video Weiss describes learning of the first detection of gravitational waves. Watch more videos from MIT: http://www.youtube.com/user/MITNewsOffice?sub_confirmation=1 The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is an independent, coeducational, privately endowed university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Our mission is to advance knowledge; to educate students in science, engineering, and technology; and to tackle the most pressing problems facing the world today. We are a community of hands-on problem-solvers in love with fundamental science and eager to make the world a better place. The MIT YouTube channel features videos about all types of MIT research, including the robot cheetah, LIGO, gravitational waves, mathematics, and bombardier beetles, as well as videos on origami, time capsules, and other aspects of life and culture on the MIT campus. Our goal is to open the doors of MIT and bring the Institute to the world through video. Video: Melanie Gonick/MIT Interview footage: MIT Video Productions/NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Untangling the mechanics of knots
 
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Researchers at MIT and Pierre et Marie Curie University in Paris have come up with a new theory that describes how a knot's configuration, or "topology," determines its mechanical forces. (Learn more: http://mitsha.re/RVIRY ) Video: Melanie Gonick/MIT Additional footage: Stock imagery from Pond5.com
Microthrusters propel small satellites at MIT
 
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A penny-sized rocket thruster may soon power the smallest satellites in space. The device, designed by Paulo Lozano, associate professor of aeronautics and astronautics at MIT, bears little resemblance to today's bulky satellite engines, which are laden with valves, pipes and heavy propellant tanks. Instead, Lozano's design is a flat, compact square — much like a computer chip — covered with 500 microscopic tips that, when stimulated with voltage, emit tiny beams of ions. Together, the array of spiky tips creates a small puff of charged particles that can help propel a shoebox-sized satellite forward. Read more: http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2012/microthrusters-could-propel-small-satellites-0817.html Video: Melanie Gonick Additional images: Fernando Mier Hicks/NASA
New prediction tool gives warning of incoming rogue waves
 
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A new prediction tool developed by MIT engineers may give sailors a 2-3 minute warning of an incoming rogue wave, providing them with enough time to shut down essential operations on a ship or offshore platform. (Learn more: http://mitsha.re/YIAH6) Video: Melanie Gonick/MIT Rogue wave simulation tool courtesy of Themis Sapsis/MIT Mechanical Engineering Vessel at sea footage courtesy of Bigwavemaster1 (http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCu26D...) Stock media provided by Pond5.com Music sampled from, "New England is Interesting" by BOPD http://freemusicarchive.org/music/BOP... http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...
Small cubes that self-assemble
 
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Known as M-Blocks, the robots are cubes with no external moving parts. Nonetheless, they're able to climb over and around one another, leap through the air, roll across the ground, and even move while suspended upside down from metallic surfaces. Inside each M-Block is a flywheel that can reach speeds of 20,000 revolutions per minute; when the flywheel is braked, it imparts its angular momentum to the cube. On each edge of an M-Block, and on every face, are cleverly arranged permanent magnets that allow any two cubes to attach to each other. Read more: http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2013/simple-scheme-for-self-assembling-robots-1004.html Video: Melanie Gonick, MIT News
MIT reshapes itself to shape the future
 
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MIT has announced a $1 billion commitment to address the global opportunities and challenges presented by the prevalence of computing and the rise of artificial intelligence (AI). Read more: http://news.mit.edu/2018/mit-reshapes-itself-stephen-schwarzman-college-of-computing-1015 The initiative marks the single largest investment in computing and AI by an American academic institution, and will help position the United States to lead the world in preparing for the rapid evolution of computing and AI. At the heart of this endeavor will be the new MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing, made possible by a $350 million foundational gift from the chairman, CEO and co-founder of Blackstone, a leading global asset manager. Watch more videos from MIT: http://www.youtube.com/user/MITNewsOffice?sub_confirmation=1 The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is an independent, coeducational, privately endowed university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Our mission is to advance knowledge; to educate students in science, engineering, and technology; and to tackle the most pressing problems facing the world today. We are a community of hands-on problem-solvers in love with fundamental science and eager to make the world a better place. The MIT YouTube channel features videos about all types of MIT research, including the robot cheetah, LIGO, gravitational waves, mathematics, and bombardier beetles, as well as videos on origami, time capsules, and other aspects of life and culture on the MIT campus. Our goal is to open the doors of MIT and bring the Institute to the world through video. #massachusettsinstituteoftechnology
Visualizing video at the speed of light — one trillion frames per second
 
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MIT Media Lab researchers have created a new imaging system that can acquire visual data at a rate of one trillion frames per second. That's fast enough to produce a slow-motion video of light traveling through objects. Video: Melanie Gonick/MIT Read more: http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2011/trillion-fps-camera-1213.html Project website: http://www.media.mit.edu/~raskar/trillionfps/ Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/mitnews
One of the strongest lightweight materials known
 
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A team of MIT engineers has successfully designed a new 3-D material with five percent the density of steel and ten times the strength, making it one of the strongest lightweight materials known. (Learn more: http://news.mit.edu/2017/3-d-graphene-strongest-lightest-materials-0106) Watch more videos from MIT: http://www.youtube.com/user/MITNewsOffice?sub_confirmation=1 The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is an independent, coeducational, privately endowed university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Our mission is to advance knowledge; to educate students in science, engineering, and technology; and to tackle the most pressing problems facing the world today. We are a community of hands-on problem-solvers in love with fundamental science and eager to make the world a better place. The MIT YouTube channel features videos about all types of MIT research, including the robot cheetah, LIGO, gravitational waves, mathematics, and bombardier beetles, as well as videos on origami, time capsules, and other aspects of life and culture on the MIT campus. Our goal is to open the doors of MIT and bring the Institute to the world through video. Video: Melanie Gonick/MIT 3-D printing footage and experiment simulation: Gang Seob Jung/Zhao Qin Graphene animation: Pond5/edited by Melanie Gonick
Glasses-free 3-D TV at MIT
 
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As striking as it is, the illusion of depth now routinely offered by 3-D movies is a paltry facsimile of a true three-dimensional visual experience. In the real world, as you move around an object, your perspective on it changes. But in a movie theater showing a 3-D movie, everyone in the audience has the same, fixed perspective — and has to wear cumbersome glasses, to boot. Despite impressive recent advances, holographic television, which would present images that vary with varying perspectives, probably remains some distance in the future. But in a new paper featured as a research highlight at this summer's Siggraph computer-graphics conference, the MIT Media Lab's Camera Culture group offers a new approach to multiple-perspective, glasses-free 3-D that could prove much more practical in the short term. Instead of the complex hardware required to produce holograms, the Media Lab system uses several layers of liquid-crystal displays (LCDs), the technology currently found in most flat-panel TVs. To produce a convincing 3-D illusion, the displays would need to refresh at a rate of about 360 times a second, or 360 hertz. Such displays may not be far off: LCD TVs that boast 240-hertz refresh rates have already appeared on the market, just a few years after 120-hertz TVs made their debut. Read more: http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2012/glasses-free-3D-television-0712.html Video: Melanie Gonick, MIT News Additional footage: Camera Culture Group, MIT Media Lab
Vanishing friction
 
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Physicists at MIT have developed an experimental technique to simulate friction at the nanoscale. (Learn more about this technique: http://mitne.ws/1SYO90t) Using their technique, the researchers are able to directly observe individual atoms at the interface of two surfaces and manipulate their arrangement, tuning the amount of friction between the surfaces. By changing the spacing of atoms on one surface, they observed a point at which friction disappears. Video produced and edited by Melanie Gonick/MIT Computer simulations courtesy of Alexei Bylinkskii Music sampled from "Insatiable Toad" by Blue Dot Sessions http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Blue_Dot_Sessions/Origami_1726/Insatiable_Toad https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Glowing plants
 
02:08
MIT engineers have been able to induce plants to give off a dim light for nearly four hours. And they believe that, with further optimization, such plants will one day be bright enough to illuminate an entire workspace. (Learn more: http://news.mit.edu/2017/engineers-create-nanobionic-plants-that-glow-1213) Watch more videos from MIT: http://www.youtube.com/user/MITNewsOffice?sub_confirmation=1 The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is an independent, coeducational, privately endowed university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Our mission is to advance knowledge; to educate students in science, engineering, and technology; and to tackle the most pressing problems facing the world today. We are a community of hands-on problem-solvers in love with fundamental science and eager to make the world a better place. The MIT YouTube channel features videos about all types of MIT research, including the robot cheetah, LIGO, gravitational waves, mathematics, and bombardier beetles, as well as videos on origami, time capsules, and other aspects of life and culture on the MIT campus. Our goal is to open the doors of MIT and bring the Institute to the world through video. Video: Melanie Gonick/MIT Additional footage: Seonyeong Kwak/Strano Research Group at MIT
Controlling the bubbles of boiling water
 
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For the first time, researchers at MIT have found a way to control the boiling process. The system could improve the efficiency of electric power generation and other processes. (Learn more: http://mitsha.re/TRIQl) Turning boiling on and off on a surface with separately addressable electrodes to the tune of Ode to Joy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1pf8gpFb_sE Video: Melanie Gonick/MIT Additional imagery courtesy of the researchers
A Moment in Time: Time capsule found during construction at MIT
 
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Back in the early stages of construction for MIT.nano, members of the crew stumbled upon something that clearly didn't belong: A time capsule buried in 1957 as part of the dedication to the Compton Laboratories. (Learn more about the time capsule: http://mitsha.re/UNSpl) Video: Melanie Gonick/MIT MIT.nano site footage: Lillie Paquette/MIT School of Engineering Historic time capsule footage: Harold E. Edgerton Collection, MIT Museum ©2010 Additional archival documents and photos: MIT Museum Killian Court image: Brian Keegan Music sampled from, "Endless Story About Sun and Moon" by Kai Engel http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Kai_Engel/Idea/Kai_Engel_-_Idea_-_02_Endless_Story_About_Sun_and_Moon http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Siberian Traps likely triggered end-Permian mass extinction
 
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Around 252 millions years ago life on Earth collapsed in a unprecedented fashion as more than 96 percent of marine species and 70 percent of land species disappeared. The cause of this severe extinction has been a mystery, until now. (Learn more: http://bit.ly/1McanIw) MIT researchers have now determined the Siberian Traps erupted at the right time and for the right duration to have been a likely trigger for the end-Permian extinction. Video produced and edited by Melanie Gonick/MIT Additional footage and stills: Henrik Svensen, Scott Simper and Seth Burgess Music sampled from "Out" by Ryan Cross http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Ryan_Cross/Dah_Gunk/Out http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/
Unique languages, universal patterns
 
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MIT News - February 23, 2012 To the chagrin of anyone who knows one of these languages but not the other, English and Japanese appear to be frustratingly different tongues governed by drastically different rules. And yet, under the surface, English and Japanese have deep similarities, as MIT linguist Shigeru Miyagawa argues in his new book, Case, Argument Structure, and Word Order, published this month in Routledge's "Leading Linguists" series. In turn, the similarities between English and Japanese underscore a larger point about human language, in Miyagawa's view: All its varieties exist within a relatively structured framework. Languages are different, but not radically different. Dating to the 1950s, in fact, much of MIT's linguistics program has aimed to identify the similar pathways that apparently unrelated languages take. "There is this very interesting tension in language between diversity and uniformity," says Miyagawa, the Kochi Prefecture-John Manjiro Professor of Japanese Language and Culture at MIT. "Human languages are diverse in stunning ways. Each one has some unique property that distinguishes it from 6,500 or maybe 7,000 other languages. But when you look as a linguist, you begin to notice that there are uniform properties shared by languages." Read more at MIT News: http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2012/unique-universal-languages-0223.html
Ultrasound drug delivery
 
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Using ultrasound waves, researchers have found a way to enable rapid delivery of drugs to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This approach could make it easier to deliver drugs to patients suffering from GI disorders. (Learn more: http://mitsha.re/TGzKW) Video produced and edited by Melanie Gonick/MIT Animation courtesy of the researchers Music sampled from "Water & Spirit" by James Joshua Otto http://freemusicarchive.org/music/James_Joshua_Otto/And_then_the_mountains_moved/Water__Spirit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Sorting cells with sound waves
 
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Researchers from MIT, Pennsylvania State University, and Carnegie Mellon University have devised a new way to separate cells by exposing them to sound waves as they flow through a tiny channel. (Learn more about the device: http://bit.ly/1wwDlxV) Their device, about the size of a dime, could be used to detect the extremely rare tumor cells that circulate in cancer patients’ blood, helping doctors predict whether a tumor is going to spread. Video produced and edited by Melanie Gonick, MIT News Video clips provided by Ming Dao
Cleaning up oil spills with magnets at MIT
 
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MIT researchers have developed a new technique for magnetically separating oil and water that could be used to clean up oil spills. They believe that, with their technique, the oil could be recovered for use, offsetting much of the cost of cleanup. The researchers will present their work at the International Conference on Magnetic Fluids in January. Shahriar Khushrushahi, a postdoc in MIT's Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, is lead author on the paper, joined by Markus Zahn, the Thomas and Gerd Perkins Professor of Electrical Engineering, and T. Alan Hatton, the Ralph Landau Professor of Chemical Engineering. The team has also filed two patents on its work. In the MIT researchers' scheme, water-repellent ferrous nanoparticles would be mixed with the oil, which could then be separated from the water using magnets. The researchers envision that the process would take place aboard an oil-recovery vessel, to prevent the nanoparticles from contaminating the environment. Afterward, the nanoparticles could be magnetically removed from the oil and reused. Video: Melanie Gonick Additional footage courtesy of: Shahriar Khushrushahi
Vision Correcting Displays
 
02:29
Researchers at the MIT Media Laboratory and the University of California at Berkeley have developed a new display technology that automatically corrects for vision defects — no glasses (or contact lenses) required. (Learn more about the display: http://bit.ly/1s6xeuR) Video: Melanie Gonick, MIT News Additional footage and artist renderings courtesy of Gordon Wetzstein
Secrets of the conch shell and its toughness
 
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The shells of marine organisms take a beating from impacts due to storms and tides, rocky shores, and sharp-toothed predators. But as recent research has demonstrated, one type of shell stands out above all the others in its toughness: the conch. Now, researchers at MIT have shown that the conch shell’s superior strength can be reproduced in engineered materials. (Learn more: http://news.mit.edu/2017/conch-shells-better-helmets-body-armor-0526) Watch more videos from MIT: http://www.youtube.com/user/MITNewsOffice?sub_confirmation=1 The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is an independent, coeducational, privately endowed university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Our mission is to advance knowledge; to educate students in science, engineering, and technology; and to tackle the most pressing problems facing the world today. We are a community of hands-on problem-solvers in love with fundamental science and eager to make the world a better place. The MIT YouTube channel features videos about all types of MIT research, including the robot cheetah, LIGO, gravitational waves, mathematics, and bombardier beetles, as well as videos on origami, time capsules, and other aspects of life and culture on the MIT campus. Our goal is to open the doors of MIT and bring the Institute to the world through video. Video: Melanie Gonick/MIT Helmet graphic: CUBE3D Graphic Additional footage: Stock imagery edited by Melanie Gonick
MIT.nano: An Overview
 
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MIT.nano will be a 200,000-square-foot research facility for nanoscale research constructed at the very heart of the MIT campus. (Learn more about MIT.nano: http://bit.ly/1mZ8CUV) The building will house state-of-the-art cleanroom, imaging, and prototyping facilities supporting research with nanoscale materials and processes — in fields including energy, health, life sciences, quantum sciences, electronics, and manufacturing.