Home
Videos like this “MIT Glass Lab: Where art meets science”
Math is the hidden secret to understanding the world | Roger Antonsen
 
17:05
Unlock the mysteries and inner workings of the world through one of the most imaginative art forms ever -- mathematics -- with Roger Antonsen, as he explains how a slight change in perspective can reveal patterns, numbers and formulas as the gateways to empathy and understanding. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector
Views: 328282 TED
Making Glass
 
09:58
Students love combining art and chemistry to make colored glass using different transition metal salts. This video is part of the Flinn Scientific Best Practices for Teaching Chemistry Video Series, a collection of over 125 hours of free professional development training for chemistry teachers - http://elearning.flinnsci.com ATTENTION: This demonstration is intended for and should only be performed by certified science instructors in a safe laboratory/classroom setting. Be sure to subscribe and check out more videos! Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/FlinnScientific/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FlinnScientific/ Website: https://www.flinnsci.com/
Views: 11151 FlinnScientific
Amazing Technology Invented By MIT - Tangible Media
 
03:41
At the MIT Media Lab, the Tangible Media Group believes the future of computing is tactile. Unveiled today, the inFORM is MIT's new scrying pool for imagining the interfaces of tomorrow. Almost like a table of living clay, the inFORM is a surface that three-dimensionally changes shape, allowing users to not only interact with digital content in meatspace, but even hold hands with a person hundreds of miles away. And that's only the beginning. Created by Daniel Leithinger and Sean Follmer and overseen by Professor Hiroshi Ishii, the technology behind the inFORM isn't that hard to understand. It's basically a fancy Pinscreen, one of those executive desk toys that allows you to create a rough 3-D model of an object by pressing it into a bed of flattened pins. With inFORM, each of those "pins" is connected to a motor controlled by a nearby laptop, which can not only move the pins to render digital content physically, but can also register real-life objects interacting with its surface thanks to the sensors of a hacked Microsoft Kinect. Source : http://is.gd/JA9UBr
Views: 15027798 Hashem Al-Ghaili
The Glass Age, Part 2:  Strong, Durable Glass
 
10:21
Ever crack your cell phone screen? How about your car windshield? Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman explain why those days may soon be behind us. Watch as they conduct mind-bending demonstrations of strong, durable glass. This is the Glass Age, where materials science is constantly pushing boundaries and creating new possibilities for glass-enabled technology and design. See how glass is shaping the future at www.TheGlassAge.com. Presented by Corning.
Views: 4002889 Corning Incorporated
15-Yr-Old Kelvin Doe Wows M.I.T.
 
10:07
To support Kelvin and young innovators like him, please visit http://www.crowdrise.com/InnovateSalone 15-Year-Old Kelvin Doe is an engineering whiz living in Sierra Leone who scours the trash bins for spare parts, which he uses to build batteries, generators and transmitters. Completely self-taught, Kelvin has created his own radio station where he broadcasts news and plays music under the moniker, DJ Focus. Kelvin became the youngest person in history to be invited to the "Visiting Practitioner's Program" at MIT. THNKR had exclusive access to Kelvin and his life-changing journey - experiencing the US for the first time, exploring incredible opportunities, contending with homesickness, and mapping out his future. Here is a link to the Bobby Fala track in the video on SoundCloud: http://soundcloud.com/karen-kilberg/kpei-ragga Photos courtesy of Adam Cohn (http://www.adamcohn.com/) and Paula Aguilera PRODIGIES is a bi-weekly series showcasing the youngest and brightest as they challenge themselves to reach new heights and the stories behind them. Created and produced by @radical.media, THNKR gives you extraordinary access to the people, stories, places and thinking that will change your mind. Follow THNKR on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/thnkr Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/thnkrtv Check out our Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/thnkr/ SUBSCRIBE! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thnkrtv
Views: 14156778 THNKR
Why you should make useless things | Simone Giertz
 
11:58
In this joyful, heartfelt talk featuring demos of her wonderfully wacky creations, Simone Giertz shares her craft: making useless robots. Her inventions -- designed to chop vegetables, cut hair, apply lipstick and more -- rarely (if ever) succeed, and that's the point. "The true beauty of making useless things [is] this acknowledgment that you don't always know what the best answer is," Giertz says. "It turns off that voice in your head that tells you that you know exactly how the world works. Maybe a toothbrush helmet isn't the answer, but at least you're asking the question." Check out more TED Talks: http://www.ted.com The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. Follow TED on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED
Views: 1720358 TED
GlassLab Design Session: Peter Sís
 
02:53
Illustrator Peter Sís describes working at GlassLab during a design session at The Corning Museum of Glass, June 12 - 13, 2012. http://www.cmog.org/glasslab
Views: 159891 Corning Museum of Glass
The REAL Answer To The Viral Chinese Math Problem "How Old Is The Captain?"
 
07:24
Media outlets around the world went crazy over a 5th grade math exam question in China. But they all missed the real story! The problem actually dates back to French researchers in 1979. In this video I present the real story to the viral "Chinese" captain's age question. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/MindYourDecisions?sub_confirmation=1 Update thanks to comment from Markus Schüt: the origin dates back to 1841 in a letter Flaubert wrote! See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Age_of_the_captain My blog post for this video: https://wp.me/p6aMk-5rE Captain's age question "If a ship had 26 sheep and 10 goats onboard, how old is the ship's captain?" South China Morning Post http://www.scmp.com/news/china/society/article/2130892/26-sheep-10-goats-lot-flak-over-chinese-primary-school-maths-exam The Portal (Chinese) http://www.thepaper.cn/newsDetail_forward_1971117 RT https://www.rt.com/news/417231-china-math-problem-sheep-goats/ BBC http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-42857864 Washington Post https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2018/01/31/this-chinese-math-problem-has-no-answer-actually-it-has-a-lot-of-them/ Newsweek http://www.newsweek.com/can-you-solve-it-bizarre-math-exam-question-leaves-students-scratching-their-796005 Official response (Chinese). http://news.sina.com.cn/s/wh/2018-01-27/doc-ifyqzcxh0729685.shtml Sherlock Holmes' deduction in The Hound of the Baskervilles https://www.quora.com/What-are-some-of-the-best-deductions-by-Sherlock-Holmes Novotná, Jarmila, and Bernard Sarrazy. "Model of a professor’s didactical action in mathematics education: professor’s variability and students’ algorithmic flexibility in solving arithmetical problems." The Fourth Congress of the European Society in Mathematics Education. 2005. http://www.erme.tu-dortmund.de/~erme/CERME4/CERME4_WG6.pdf#page=68 de Corte, Eric, Brian Greer, and Lieven Verschaffel, eds. Making Sense of Word Problems. CRC Press, 2000. Pages 3-5. https://books.google.com/books?id=OOyHRpWsI7sC&lpg=PR7&ots=oRk2XlgRGu&dq=%2226%20sheep%22%20%2210%20goats%22%20boat&lr&pg=PA4#v=onepage&q=%2226%20sheep%22%20%2210%20goats%22%20boat&f=false Reusser, Kurt. "Problem solving beyond the logic of things: Contextual effects on understanding and solving word problems." Instructional Science. 17.4 (1988): 309-338. https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED270327.pdf Benjamin Dickman Twitter and tweet https://twitter.com/benjamindickman/status/960304080462798851 Benjamin Dickman answer on Math Educators Stack Exchange https://matheducators.stackexchange.com/questions/11543/does-the-how-old-is-the-shepherd-phenomenon-occur-for-more-relatable-word-prob/11546#11546 Gene Wirchenko blog http://genew.ca/solving-the-right-problem-right/ If you like my videos, you can support me at Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/mindyourdecisions Connect on social media. I update each site when I have a new video or blog post, so you can follow me on whichever method is most convenient for you. My Blog: https://mindyourdecisions.com/blog/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/preshtalwalkar Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mind-Your-Decisions/168446714965 Google+: https://plus.google.com/108336608566588374147/posts Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/preshtalwalkar/ Tumblr: https://preshtalwalkar.tumblr.com/ Instagram: https://instagram.com/preshtalwalkar/ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/mindyourdecisions Newsletter (sent only for big news, like a new book release): http://eepurl.com/KvS0r If you buy from the links below I may receive a commission for sales. This has no effect on the price for you. My Books "The Joy of Game Theory" shows how you can use math to out-think your competition. (rated 3.8/5 stars on 31 reviews) http://amzn.to/1uQvA20 "The Irrationality Illusion: How To Make Smart Decisions And Overcome Bias". (rated 4.6/5 stars on 3 reviews) http://amzn.to/1o3FaAg "Math Puzzles Volume 1" features classic brain teasers and riddles with complete solutions for problems in counting, geometry, probability, and game theory. Volume 1 is rated 4.4/5 stars on 13 reviews. http://amzn.to/1GhUUSH "Math Puzzles Volume 2". (rated 4.3/5 stars on 4 reviews) http://amzn.to/1NKbyCs "Math Puzzles Volume 3". (rated 3.8/5 stars on 5 reviews) http://amzn.to/1NKbGlp "40 Paradoxes in Logic, Probability, and Game Theory" contains thought-provoking and counter-intuitive results. (rated 4.3/5 stars on 12 reviews) http://amzn.to/1LOCI4U "The Best Mental Math Tricks" teaches how you can look like a math genius by solving problems in your head (rated 4.7/5 stars on 4 reviews) http://amzn.to/18maAdo "Multiply Numbers By Drawing Lines" This book is a reference guide for my video that has over 1 million views on a geometric method to multiply numbers. (rated 5/5 stars on 3 reviews) http://amzn.to/XRm7M4
Views: 3023152 MindYourDecisions
A robot that eats pollution | Jonathan Rossiter
 
14:11
Meet the "Row-bot," a robot that cleans up pollution and generates the electricity needed to power itself by swallowing dirty water. Roboticist Jonathan Rossiter explains how this special swimming machine, which uses a microbial fuel cell to neutralize algal blooms and oil slicks, could be a precursor to biodegradable, autonomous pollution-fighting robots. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector
Views: 106850 TED
DIY: Fairy Glow Jars
 
03:07
Enjoy! For those lasting how long it lasts- virtually forever! As long as you use actual glow in the dark paint and not a temporary glowstick, you should be able to recharge it and reuse it over and over again. My glow is still going strong! Things Needed: Jar Glow in the Dark Paint Paintbrushes (preferably longer) Paper to put paint onto School Glue (optional) Glitter (optional) Music is not my own- Lights (Instrumental) by Elie Goulding Photo from: http://frompankawithlove.wordpress.com/2012/01/08/glowing-jar-project-varazslat-a-lakasban-enhu/ Original Blogpost: http://frompankawithlove.blogspot.com/2012/01/glowing-jar-project-varazslat-lakasban.html
Views: 17808501 Nava Hannah
MIT cheetah robot lands the running jump
 
01:48
In a leap for robotic development, the MIT researchers who built a robotic cheetah have now trained it to see and jump over hurdles as it runs — making this the first four-legged robot to run and jump over obstacles autonomously. (Learn more: http://bit.ly/1JYy1bD) Watch the MIT cheetah run outside: http://youtu.be/XMKQbqnXXhQ Video: Haewon Park, Patrick Wensing and Sangbae Kim
It costs 70 MILLION dollars per kg! But why?
 
12:28
Sometimes science can be expensive!!! I frequent deal with stable isotopes which can happily reach tens of thousands of dollars per gram. In this case ~$70 000 per gram for 41K. In this case I only had about 1/3rd of a gram. Now it might seem like a lot, but bear in mind this is not really something you can sell. The market for 41K in the entire world is almost nothing. Indeed the only thing that gives it value is it costs so much to make it. Thankfully, this stuff did good work! We got some of the best measurements on the hydration of potassium in the world!! Indeed they were good enough to highlight some of the previous knowledge about 41K, to the point where I had to bring this sample out of retirement and send it back to the reactor to check the properties of the nucleus. I wont be adding this to the patreon feed, but many thanks to all those who support this channel! https://www.patreon.com/Thunderf00t
Views: 2452237 Thunderf00t
HOW ABUNDANCE WILL CHANGE THE WORLD - Elon Musk 2017
 
14:53
This is a summary of everything future discussed at the Singularity University summit 2017, Ted talks with Elon Musk 2017, World Government Summit 2017 and Peter Diamandis views on HOW ABUNDANCE WILL CHANGE THE WORLD as we know it. SUBSCRIBE HERE: http://youtube.com/c/jonasbjerg?sub_confirmation=1 Links: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3cXPWyP0BBs (Singularity university summit - Peter Diamandis) The demonetization of living Maslows pyramid of needs are trending towards 0-cost Abundance and nanotechnology (nanobots) Raw material cost + energy cost + Information = COST 3:47 In the back of abundance 4:00 Most people will have devices for free so that you can buy stuff from them and they can collect data 7:00 Data is the new gold 7:30 Free content 1b hours of free content pr day. 8000X more energy hitting the surface of the planet than we consume, and the poorest have the most sun 8:00 solar roads 9:30 2.9 cents pr kWh Giga factory in Reno 10:00 cars from 1904 to 1917 100% switch 11:00 by 2025 car ownership will be dead: 12:20 autonomy will demonetize housing 13:20 house being 3d printed 14:26 literacy to basic reading writing in 18 months 16:03 demonetization of healthcare, deep learning protocols 17:00 Watson diagnosed rare leukaemia 18:00 Cost of genome sequencing Morse law 19:05 Sequenced when born, stop what you will get sick from before people get sick Surgery 20:00 Rapidly demonetizing trends everywhere 21:30 Not scared of AI terminator 23:00 Job loss 24:00 Demonetize the cost of living, (education, entertainment, food etc) Psychological impact to losing job 24:30 AI software shells 27:30 within ten years UBI Universal Basic Income https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zIwLWfaAg-8 (Elon Musk Building) 10fold improvement in cost of digging pr. Mile no sound The boring company Autonomy brings more cars on the roads Every big car company has announced electric cars within 10 years 12:00 By the end of 2017 self-driving coast to coast 15:00 Free self-driving cars 19:30 Self-driving trucks tesla semi out torc any diesel semi uphill 20:30 Solar panels 22:00 Most houses have enough roof area to power all the needs of the house 25:30 Giga factory 100 27:00 100 gWh pr week 1 build announcing another 5 this year 29:00 reusability rocket 33:00 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCoFKUJ_8Yo (Elon Musk World Government Summit 2017) Multi planetary species is life insurance for life collectively 2:30 Ten years from now full autonomy cars will only be build 8:30 Elon building tunnel under Washington 14:20 3d building, 2d road network 16:00 12-15% driving as a job 18:20 over 2B vehicles in the world 19:00 100M total new vehicle production cap 19:00 life of car 20-25 years 19:00 Prepare government for the future 20:00 AR regulation Transport 21:00 electric over 30-40 years Demand for electricity will increase rapidly. Total energy usage = 1/3 electricity 1/3 transport 1/3 heating over time that will predominantly be all electricity 21:30 Universal basic income, no choice 22:50 Fewer and fewer jobs that a robot cannot do better The output of goods and services will be extremely high with automation, so they will come abundance and come really cheap. The harder challenge is, how do people then have meaning? To some degree we are already a cyborg 25:21 Reusable rockets, cost to fly close to plane 29:00 Social Media: Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/jonasislive Snapchat: Jonasislive Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jonasislive My gear: #1 Panasonic Lumix G series (G85/G81) http://amzn.to/2ruwFTN #2 Canon g7x mark II http://amzn.to/2rpzd6D http://amzn.to/2qk4Cai http://amzn.to/2qrrLCM #3 SJCAM 4000 http://amzn.to/2rpfDHr http://amzn.to/2rpqt0f http://amzn.to/2qk4W8P #4 regular iPhone camera http://amzn.to/2qrs68w http://amzn.to/2rpc582 http://amzn.to/2qjW82J #5 huanqi 899b drone http://amzn.to/2qG2PfR
Views: 1166645 Jonas Bjerg
Visualizing video at the speed of light — one trillion frames per second
 
02:47
MIT Media Lab researchers have created a new imaging system that can acquire visual data at a rate of one trillion frames per second. That's fast enough to produce a slow-motion video of light traveling through objects. Video: Melanie Gonick/MIT Read more: http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2011/trillion-fps-camera-1213.html Project website: http://www.media.mit.edu/~raskar/trillionfps/ Follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/mitnews
Professor Eric Laithwaite: The Circle of Magnetism - 1968
 
19:44
Professor Eric Laithwaite (1921-1997) of Imperial College London demonstrates some of the most difficult concepts in electricity &​ magnetism. This is one of a series of 16mm colour films made for schools. They were all made in Eric Laithwaite's "Heavy Electrical Laboratory" in the Electrical Engineering Department at Imperial College London. For more on Eric Laithwaite: http://www2.imperial.ac.uk/blog/videoarchive/2009/12/09/eric-laithwaite/
Views: 158376 Imperial College London
This new telescope might show us the beginning of the universe | Wendy Freedman
 
15:39
When and how did the universe begin? A global group of astronomers wants to answer that question by peering as far back in time as a large new telescope will let us see. Wendy Freedman headed the creation of the Giant Magellan Telescope, under construction in South America; at TEDGlobal in Rio, she shares a bold vision of the discoveries about our universe that the GMT could make possible. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector
Views: 98940 TED
6 Chemical Reactions That Changed History
 
07:56
Viewers like you help make PBS (Thank you 😃) . Support your local PBS Member Station here: https://to.pbs.org/PBSDSDonate Chemicals React! Get yourself an awesome IOTBS shirt! http://dftba.com/besmart ↓ More info and sources below ↓ For lots more of history’s greatest chemical innovations, check out “The Chemistry Book” by Derek B. Lowe: http://amzn.to/1snWG44 ---- Have an idea for an episode or an amazing science question you want answered? Leave a comment or check us out at the links below! Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/itsokaytobesmart Follow on Twitter: http://twitter.com/okaytobesmart http://twitter.com/jtotheizzoe Follow on Tumblr: http://www.itsokaytobesmart.com Follow on Instagram: http://instagram.com/jtotheizzoe Follow on Snapchat: YoDrJoe ----------------- It’s Okay To Be Smart is written and hosted by Joe Hanson, Ph.D. Follow me on Twitter: @jtotheizzoe Produced by PBS Digital Studios: http://www.youtube.com/user/pbsdigitalstudios Editing and Motion Graphics by Arts + Labor Music via APM Stock images from SciencePhoto http://www.sciencephoto.com/ and Shutterstock http://www.shutterstock.com Stock footage from Videoblocks (unless otherwise noted) http://www.videoblocks.com
Views: 1021904 It's Okay To Be Smart
GlassLab in Paris: Didier Tisseyre
 
02:56
The Corning Museum of Glass partnered with the Musée des Arts Décoratifs to present GlassLab, the Museum's design program, in Paris, in the Tuileries Garden, October 22-27, 2013. Designer Didier Tisseyre worked with GlassLab glassmakers to explore encasing graphic copper elements in blown glass. http://www.cmog.org/glasslab/designers/didier-tisseyre
The thrilling potential of SixthSense technology | Pranav Mistry
 
15:20
http://www.ted.com At TEDIndia, Pranav Mistry demos several tools that help the physical world interact with the world of data -- including a deep look at his SixthSense device and a new, paradigm-shifting paper "laptop." In an onstage Q&A, Mistry says he'll open-source the software behind SixthSense, to open its possibilities to all. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes. Featured speakers have included Al Gore on climate change, Philippe Starck on design, Jill Bolte Taylor on observing her own stroke, Nicholas Negroponte on One Laptop per Child, Jane Goodall on chimpanzees, Bill Gates on malaria and mosquitoes, Pattie Maes on the "Sixth Sense" wearable tech, and "Lost" producer JJ Abrams on the allure of mystery. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design, and TEDTalks cover these topics as well as science, business, development and the arts. Closed captions and translated subtitles in a variety of languages are now available on TED.com, at http://www.ted.com/translate. Watch a highlight reel of the Top 10 TEDTalks at http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/top10
Views: 4264361 TED
Donald Sadoway: The missing link to renewable energy
 
15:16
http://www.ted.com What's the key to using alternative energy, like solar and wind? Storage -- so we can have power on tap even when the sun's not out and the wind's not blowing. In this accessible, inspiring talk, Donald Sadoway takes to the blackboard to show us the future of large-scale batteries that store renewable energy. As he says: "We need to think about the problem differently. We need to think big. We need to think cheap." TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes. Featured speakers have included Al Gore on climate change, Philippe Starck on design, Jill Bolte Taylor on observing her own stroke, Nicholas Negroponte on One Laptop per Child, Jane Goodall on chimpanzees, Bill Gates on malaria and mosquitoes, Pattie Maes on the "Sixth Sense" wearable tech, and "Lost" producer JJ Abrams on the allure of mystery. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design, and TEDTalks cover these topics as well as science, business, development and the arts. Closed captions and translated subtitles in a variety of languages are now available on TED.com, at http://www.ted.com/translate If you have questions or comments about this or other TED videos, please go to http://support.ted.com
Views: 388883 TED
MIT Media Lab: Program in Media Arts & Sciences
 
06:25
What is it like to be a grad student at the MIT Media Lab? The Media Lab is a community of inventors who work together in 25+ research groups, doing the things that conventional wisdom says can’t or shouldn't be done. Students come to the Media Lab through the Program in Media Arts and Sciences (MAS), based within MIT’s School of Architecture + Planning. Each year, the program accepts approximately 30-40 master’s and PhD students with backgrounds ranging from computer science, to music, to architecture. Here is a snapshot of life at the Media Lab, from research to community and environment. For more information, visit: https://www.media.mit.edu/posts/open-house/
Views: 11773 MIT Media Lab
The emergence of "4D printing" | Skylar Tibbits
 
08:23
3D printing has grown in sophistication since the late 1970s; TED Fellow Skylar Tibbits is shaping the next development, which he calls 4D printing, where the fourth dimension is time. This emerging technology will allow us to print objects that then reshape themselves or self-assemble over time. Think: a printed cube that folds before your eyes, or a printed pipe able to sense the need to expand or contract. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector
Views: 899692 TED
Lec 1 | MIT 6.042J Mathematics for Computer Science, Fall 2010
 
44:09
Lecture 1: Introduction and Proofs Instructor: Tom Leighton View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/6-042JF10 License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 805868 MIT OpenCourseWare
The Amazing Birth Of A Hand Blown Glass Pitcher
 
01:55
You can purchase the glass pitcher from this video here: http://bit.ly/ConfettiPitcher Watch artisans in Mexico expertly fashion a multi-colored glass pitcher by hand. Glass blowing is truly mesmerizing to watch - the hot glass is like treacle - one false move and you have to start over.
Views: 25471727 NOVICA
MIT Hobby Shop
 
05:33
In the 1937-38 academic year, Vannevar Bush, then Vice President of MIT, granted a group of 16 MIT students permission to use a room in the basement of building 2. With equipment they found around the Institute they set up a wood and metal shop in the 16-foot by 22-foot area. The club members chose the name "Hobby Shop" based on their belief in the philosophy that the well rounded individual pursued interests outside their profession - hobbies. Now in its 75th year, we take a look back how the Hobby Shop began, and evolved to what it is today. MIT Hobby Shop: http://studentlife.mit.edu/hobbyshop Video: Melanie Gonick Still images: Courtesy of The MIT Hobby Shop
Why our universe might exist on a knife-edge | Gian Giudice
 
14:11
The biggest surprise of discovering the Higgs boson? That there were no surprises. Gian Giudice talks us through a problem in theoretical physics: what if the Higgs field exists in an ultra-dense state that could mean the collapse of all atomic matter? With wit and charm, Giudice outlines a grim fate -- and why we shouldn't start worrying just yet. (Filmed at TEDxCERN.) TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector
Views: 705162 TED
What will future jobs look like? | Andrew McAfee
 
14:26
Economist Andrew McAfee suggests that, yes, probably, droids will take our jobs -- or at least the kinds of jobs we know now. In this far-seeing talk, he thinks through what future jobs might look like, and how to educate coming generations to hold them. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/translate Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector
Views: 807578 TED
A mirror paradox, Klein bottles and Rubik's cubes
 
16:13
The Mathologer puts the latest $2000 addition to his Klein bottle collection to work. A couple of first-ever fun mathematical stunts in this video. This video finishes with a puzzle for you to think about. We posted a video with the solution on 1 August 2015: https://youtu.be/ZMC61C5tigA Enjoy! Burkard Polster and Giuseppe Geracitano P.S.: Most of of Burkard's glass Klein bottles as well as the Klein bottle hat were made by Cliff Stoll of ACME Klein bottles (www.kleinbottle.com). The metal 3d-printed Klein bottle opener was made by Bathsheba Grossman (www.bathsheba.com).
Views: 1300038 Mathologer
How Do One-Way Mirrors Work?
 
02:51
How can a single piece of glass look like a mirror from one side but a window from the other? It's not magic, it's materials technology. Learn more at HowStuffWorks.com: http://science.howstuffworks.com/question421.htm Share on Facebook: http://goo.gl/b6Tts3 Share on Twitter: http://goo.gl/mQM4qB Subscribe: http://goo.gl/ZYI7Gt Visit our site: http://www.brainstuffshow.com Hi! I’m Jonathan, this is BrainStuff, and today we’re talking one-way mirrors, aka two-way mirrors, aka half-silvered mirrors, aka transparent mirrors, aka security mirrors, aka surveillance mirrors, aka observer-ator-trons. Y’know, those things you see in crime dramas when one cop’s interrogating a suspect, while another watches through a window that appears - from the suspect’s side - to be a mirror. It’s not magic. TV cops aren’t wizards. Except sometimes they are. But that’s fiction, and transparent mirrors are science. Specifically, materials science and optics. OK. A regular ol’ mirror – the kind hanging over your bathroom sink – is a sheet of glass holding up an extremely thin layer of reflective metal. The metal comes in the form of a metallic salt, which can be dissolved in liquid and sprayed onto the glass in a process called silvering. That’s because silver nitrate was the first stuff used for this process. These days, most mirrors are actually silvered with aluminum, which is cheaper and sturdier. But silvering doesn’t make perfect mirrors: They reflect most light, but a little is still transmitted through infinitesimal gaps in the reflective metal layer. So everyday mirrors receive an opaque backing, like dark paint. This stops cold any photons that slip through the metal layer (and protects it from scratches). Without the backing, you’d be able to faintly see the wall behind the mirror. But what if you purposefully make a mirror imperfect? Manufacturers of transparent mirrors spray an even thinner, less dense layer of silvering onto the glass. Meaning it reflects less light – for example, let’s say half the light of an ordinary mirror. The rest passes straight through the glass like it’s a window. Which it is. A transparent mirror, with its sparse silvering and lack of backing, is just a reflective window. And it’s a window from both sides! So: How come the suspect sees his reflection, but the cop sees the suspect? It’s a trick of the light. The observer room is kept dark, while the observee’s room is lit up like the Vegas strip. So on the cop’s side, more light is coming through the glass than being reflected from the room. And from the suspect’s side, more light is reflecting from the room than being transmitted through the glass. And hey, people ask about this a lot: If you ever want to test a mirror to see if it’s transparent, block the light around you and try to peer through. A bright flashlight can help illuminate anything that might be behind the mirror. CREDITS: "Bean" movie clip from MovieClips.com YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fkHlhiG0h70 SOURCES: http://science.howstuffworks.com/question421.htm/printable http://science.howstuffworks.com/innovation/everyday-innovations/mirror.htm/printable http://articles.adsabs.harvard.edu//full/1911PASP...23...13C/0000015.000.html http://www.google.com/patents/US2996406 http://www.photonics.com/EDU/Handbook.aspx?AID=25501
Mathematics at MIT
 
04:43
Mathematics has played an important part at MIT since the founding of the Institute. Mathematics occupies a core intellectual position at MIT, an institution that is well known for its leadership in Science and Engineering. (Learn more about the MIT Mathematics: http://math.mit.edu/index.php) Video: Melanie Gonick, MIT News Music sampled from: Her breath (http://freemusicarchive.org/music/arizono_kazuhiro/EPV_070/) Artist/Composer: Arizono Kazuhiro http://soundcloud.com/arizono-kazuhiro http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/legalcode
MIT Media Lab: 3-D printing with variable densities
 
02:01
MIT Media Lab researchers Steven Keating and Neri Oxman demonstrate some of their work into 3-D printing. Read more about MIT's work around 3-D printing: http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2011/3d-printing-0914.html Video: Melanie Gonick, MIT News
Walter Lewin, MIT professor: "All of you have now lost your virginity... in Physics!" (interview)
 
04:20
Lewin's physics lectures at MIT are legendary. What does he think about bad professors? This is what he told us in an interview at Barcelona (Spain), Feb 15. More info: http://noticias.lainformacion.com/ciencia-y-tecnologia/ciencias-general/walter-lewin-professor-at-mit-teachers-who-make-physics-boring-are-criminals_ksXJkQNvtAKllRNPNXWgH2/
Views: 493160 lainformacion.com
Make your own stylish smartphone Faraday Box in 10 minutes
 
15:57
NOTE: I have made a better version. See: https://youtu.be/NguyYHPjwnI With the release of WikiLeak’s “Year Zero” information on the CIA’s capabilities, you might be forgiven if you’re worried about your privacy. It’s a bit annoying to think that some bozo is remotely activating your smartphone’s mic to spy on your extremely dramatic dinnertime conversations. You could buy some overly expensive “Faraday Bag” to stick your phone in when you’re not using it, but who wants an ugly black overpriced lunch bag? Instead, just make your own Faraday Box. It’s cheap, stylish, hip, and it only takes about 10 minutes to make! Pretty Wooden Box: http://amzn.to/2reZh0T Aluminum Foil Tape: http://amzn.to/2qfKULv Expensive Faraday Bag: http://amzn.to/2r5FFz6 Music: India - Bensound.com Original article: https://scottiestech.info/2017/03/10/build-your-own-stylish-signal-blocking-smartphone-box-in-ten-minutes/
Views: 542048 ScottiesTech.Info
MIT Robotics Team 2015 Promo Video
 
04:02
Thank you everyone who supported our crowdfunding campaign and made it such a huge success. Also, a big thank you to McElroy Films for their generous help in producing our video.
Views: 612423 MIT Robotics
Making Creativity Visible: The MIT Museum Studio and Compton Gallery
 
02:42
Located in the heart of campus under the big dome, the MIT Museum Studio and Compton Gallery is a changing exhibition space where visitors encounter a wide range of student-developed exhibitions that encompass the varied fields of science, technology, architecture, history, and art. (Learn more about the studio: https://stellar.mit.edu/S/course/STS/sp16/STS.035/) Video: Melanie Gonick/MIT Music sampled from, "All The Pieces Come Together" by Dave Depper http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Dav... http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...
Better batteries through biology
 
01:26
Lithium-air batteries have become a hot research area in recent years: They hold the promise of drastically increasing power per battery weight, which could lead, for example, to electric cars with a much greater driving range. But bringing that promise to reality has faced a number of challenges, including the need to develop better, more durable materials for the batteries' electrodes and improving the number of charging-discharging cycles the batteries can withstand. Now, MIT researchers have found that adding genetically modified viruses to the production of nanowires — wires that are about the width of a red blood cell, and which can serve as one of a battery's electrodes — could help solve some of these problems. The new work is described in a paper published in the journal Nature Communications, co-authored by graduate student Dahyun Oh, professors Angela Belcher and Yang Shao-Horn, and three others. The key to their work was to increase the surface area of the wire, thus increasing the area where electrochemical activity takes place during charging or discharging of the battery. Read more: Computer simulation: Lauren Aleza Kaye and Dahyun Oh
Advances in Architectural Geometry - MIT
 
13:15
The MIT Center for Art, Science & Technology (CAST) and the MIT Department of Architecture co-sponsored a video that was featured at the "Advances in Architectural Geometry" symposium at the Centre Pompidou in Paris from September 27-30, 2012. Architectural geometry is an emerging field using geometrical principles to approach current design challenges with a renewed mathematical rigor. As part of a presentation on the most advanced and challenging research in the field, the video spotlights the groundbreaking technologies, materials, and processes produced at MIT. Curated by Skylar Tibbits. Exhibited work and comments by: Material: John Fernandez Associate Professor, Building Technology Faculty, Department of Architecture Principal and Founder of LFArc and Urban Metabolism Group Scale: Skylar Tibbits Lecturer, Design Faculty, Department of Architecture, MIT Principal and Founder of SJET LLC Prototype: William O'Brien Jr. Assistant Professor, Department of Architecture Principal, William O'Brien Jr. LLC Movement: Joel Lamere Assistant Professor, Design Faculty, Department of Architecture, MIT Principal and Founder of GLD Modules: Nader Tehrani Department Chair, Department of Architecture, MIT Principal and Founder of NADAA Interaction: Meejin Yoon Associate Professor, Design, Faculty, Department of Architecture, MIT Principal and Founder of Howeler + Yoon/MY Studio Innovation: Sheila Kennedy Professor of Practice, Design Faculty, Department of Architecture, MIT Principal and Founder of Kennedy & Violich, www.kvarch.net Digital: Mark Goulthorpe Associate Professor, Design, Faculty, Department of Architecture, MIT Principal and Founder of dECOi Architects, HypoSurface Corp and Zero+ Videography: Paper Fortress Films
Views: 577017 Arts at MIT
Autonomous, self-contained soft robotic fish at MIT
 
03:11
Soft robots — which don't just have soft exteriors but are also powered by fluid flowing through flexible channels — have become a sufficiently popular research topic that they now have their own journal, Soft Robotics. In the first issue of that journal, out this month, MIT researchers report the first self-contained autonomous soft robot, a "fish" that can execute an escape maneuver, convulsing its body to change direction, in just 100 milliseconds, or as quickly as a real fish can. "We're excited about soft robots for a variety of reasons," says Daniela Rus, a professor of computer science and engineering, director of MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, and one of the researchers who designed and built the fish. "As robots penetrate the physical world and start interacting with people more and more, it's much easier to make robots safe if their bodies are so wonderfully soft that there's no danger if they whack you." The robotic fish was built by Andrew Marchese, a graduate student in MIT's Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and lead author on the new paper, where he's joined by Rus and postdoc Cagdas D. Onal. Each side of the fish's tail is bored through with a long, tightly undulating channel. Carbon dioxide released from a canister in the fish's abdomen causes the channel to inflate, bending the tail in the opposite direction. Read more: http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2014/soft-robotic-fish-moves-like-the-real-thing-0313.html Video: Melanie Gonick, MIT News High-speed footage courtesy of Andrew Marchese
TRANSFORM - Amazing Technology Invented By MIT
 
11:38
TRANSFORM fuses technology and design to celebrate its transformation from a piece of still furniture to a dynamic machine driven by the stream of data and energy. Created by Professor Hiroshi Ishii and the Tangible Media Group from the MIT Media Lab, TRANSFORM aims to inspire viewers with unexpected transformations, as well as the aesthetics of the complex machine in motion. The work is comprised of three dynamic shape displays that move more than one thousand pins up and down in realtime to transform the tabletop into a dynamic tangible display. The kinetic energy of the viewers, captured by a sensor, drives the wave motion represented by the dynamic pins. The motion design is inspired by the dynamic interactions among wind, water and sand in nature, Escher’s representations of perpetual motion, and the attributes of sand castles built at the seashore. TRANSFORM tells the story of the conflict between nature and machine, and its reconciliation, through the ever-changing tabletop landscape. Video Credit: MIT Media Lab/Tangible Media Group/Lexus Design Amazing 2014 Milan More details at: http://tangible.media.mit.edu
Views: 477487 Hashem Al-Ghaili
Abe Davis: New video technology that reveals an object's hidden properties
 
17:58
Subtle motion happens around us all the time, including tiny vibrations caused by sound. New technology shows that we can pick up on these vibrations and actually re-create sound and conversations just from a video of a seemingly still object. But now Abe Davis takes it one step further: Watch him demo software that lets anyone interact with these hidden properties, just from a simple video. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more. Find closed captions and translated subtitles in many languages at http://www.ted.com/talks/abe_davis_new_video_technology_that_reveals_an_object_s_hidden_properties Follow TED news on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tednews Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/TEDtalksDirector
Views: 175284 TED
MIT – Department of Materials Science and Engineering
 
06:35
The Department of Materials Science and Engineering (DMSE) at MIT are focused on teaching and learning in a hands on environment. Taking any element of the education process that isn’t “hands on” repackaging it and making it flexible for students. Working with industry and international partners to develop and implement new technologies in nanomaterials, medical devices, data, and to teach the science and engineering behind this research. Focusing on their new work in battery development, nano fibre technology and the ability to take MIT courses online, the DMSE are working hard to make education flexible and accessible to all their students.
Views: 45713 WebsEdgeEducation
SLOW MOTION SCIENCE!  Ferrofluid dropping on magnet
 
07:53
See ferrofluid falling on a magnet filmed at 1000fps. How does the science of falling ferrofluid droplets mimic speghettification while falling into a black hole? Learn more at http://curiositystream.com/physicsgirl William Osman’s Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfMJ2MchTSW2kWaT0kK94Yw William’s Christmas trailer park video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l4RR3qokY7o Want to help out with video translations for subtitles? http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UC7DdEm33SyaTDtWYGO2CwdA&tab=2 Creator: Dianna Cowern Editor: Jabril Ashe Animations: Kyle Norby Research: Sophia Chen http://physicsgirl.org/ http://twitter.com/thephysicsgirl http://facebook.com/thephysicsgirl http://instagram.com/thephysicsgirl PO Box 9281 San Diego, CA 92169
Views: 235188 Physics Girl
Spinning fibers at the nanoscale at MIT
 
01:12
A team of MIT researchers has developed a new way to generate nanofibers, using hardware built through standard chip-manufacturing processes. In their prototype, the researchers cram 25 emitters into a square centimeter, boosting nano fiber-production rates while reducing power consumption. Read more: Video clips courtesy of Luis Fernando Velazquez-Garcia
Microthrusters propel small satellites at MIT
 
02:14
A penny-sized rocket thruster may soon power the smallest satellites in space. The device, designed by Paulo Lozano, associate professor of aeronautics and astronautics at MIT, bears little resemblance to today's bulky satellite engines, which are laden with valves, pipes and heavy propellant tanks. Instead, Lozano's design is a flat, compact square — much like a computer chip — covered with 500 microscopic tips that, when stimulated with voltage, emit tiny beams of ions. Together, the array of spiky tips creates a small puff of charged particles that can help propel a shoebox-sized satellite forward. Read more: http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2012/microthrusters-could-propel-small-satellites-0817.html Video: Melanie Gonick Additional images: Fernando Mier Hicks/NASA
Magnetic Hair
 
01:29
MIT engineers have fabricated a new elastic material coated with microscopic, hairlike structures that tilt in response to a magnetic field. (Learn more about these structures: http://bit.ly/1y2E8SX) Depending on the field's orientation, the microhairs can tilt to form a path through which fluid can flow; the material can even direct water upward, against gravity. Video produced and edited by Melanie Gonick/MIT News Video clips courtesy of the researchers
Massachusetts Institute of Technology - Materials Science at the Heart of the MIT
 
05:46
MIT's Department of Materials Science and Engineering is known as a world-wide leader in the field. Their continuing record of pioneering advances in engineering sciences and technologies stems from their ability to relate new developments and advances to engineering practice and their close relationship with industry. The curriculum integrates lab and classwork and undergraduates complete a thesis based on independent research or internship experience. http://www.dmse.mit.edu
Views: 20364 WebsEdgeEducation
The next species of human | Juan Enriquez
 
18:51
http://www.ted.com Even as mega-banks topple, Juan Enriquez says the big reboot is yet to come. But don't look for it on your ballot -- or in the stock exchange. It'll come from science labs, and it promises keener bodies and minds. Our kids are going to be ... different. TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes. Featured speakers have included Al Gore on climate change, Philippe Starck on design, Jill Bolte Taylor on observing her own stroke, Nicholas Negroponte on One Laptop per Child, Jane Goodall on chimpanzees, and "Lost" producer JJ Abrams on the allure of mystery. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design, and TEDTalks cover these topics as well as science, business, development and the arts. Watch the Top 10 TEDTalks on TED.com, at http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/top10
Views: 613426 TED
(Tiny) Reconfigurable Robots at MIT
 
03:13
The device doesn't look like much: a caterpillar-sized assembly of metal rings and strips resembling something you might find buried in a home-workshop drawer. But the technology behind it, and the long-range possibilities it represents, are quite remarkable. The little device is called a milli-motein — a name melding its millimeter-sized components and a motorized design inspired by proteins, which naturally fold themselves into incredibly complex shapes. This minuscule robot may be a harbinger of future devices that could fold themselves up into almost any shape imaginable. The device was conceived by Neil Gershenfeld, head of MIT's Center for Bits and Atoms, visiting scientist Ara Knaian and graduate student Kenneth Cheung, and is described in a paper presented recently at the 2012 Intelligent Robots and Systems conference. Its key feature, Gershenfeld says: "It's effectively a one-dimensional robot that can be made in a continuous strip, without conventionally moving parts, and then folded into arbitrary shapes." Read more at MIT News: http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2012/reconfigurable-robots-turn-into-anything-1130.html Image credits: MIT Center for Bits and Atoms/Ara Knaian/Jonathan Bachrach.
Transparent Displays at MIT
 
02:44
Transparent displays have a variety of potential applications — such as the ability to see navigation or dashboard information while looking through the windshield of a car or plane, or to project video onto a window or a pair of eyeglasses. A number of technologies have been developed for such displays, but all have limitations. Now, researchers at MIT have come up with a new approach that can have significant advantages over existing systems, at least for certain kinds of applications: a wide viewing angle, simplicity of manufacture, and potentially low cost and scalability. The innovative system is described in a paper published this week in the journal Nature Communications, co-authored by MIT professors Marin Soljačić and John Joannopoulos, graduate student Chia Wei Hsu, and four others. Read more: http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2014/seeing-things-a-new-transparent-display-system-could-provide-heads-up-data-0121.html Video: Melanie Gonick, MIT News Additional video clips: Chia Wei (Wade) Hsu
Lec 1 | MIT 6.01SC Introduction to Electrical Engineering and Computer Science I, Spring 2011
 
01:17:35
Lecture 1: Object-Oriented Programming Instructor: Dennis Freeman View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/6-01SCS11 License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 498728 MIT OpenCourseWare

Will life be better in the future essay
Literature essay template
Microeconomics essay analysis varian
Amor propio essay writer
Initiation essay