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SQL Error ORA-00942 Table or View Does Not Exist in Oracle Database
 
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How to use Tab View (Data Dictionary) of Oracle Database to solve the SQL Error ORA-00942 Table or View Does Not Exist error in Oracle Database ------------------------------------------------------------------------ ►►►LINKS◄◄◄ Blog: http://bit.ly/ora-00942 Previous Tutorial ► ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ►Make sure you SUBSCRIBE and be the 1st one to see my videos! ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ►►►Find me on Social Media◄◄◄ Follow What I am up to as it happens on https://twitter.com/rebellionrider http://instagram.com/rebellionrider https://plus.google.com/+Rebellionrider http://in.linkedin.com/in/mannbhardwaj/ ___Facebook Official Page of Manish Sharma___ https://www.facebook.com/TheRebellionRider/ ___Facebook Official Page of RebellionRider.com___ https://www.facebook.com/RebellionRider.official/ You can also Email me at for E-mail address please check the About section Please please LIKE and SHARE my videos it makes me happy. Thanks for liking, commenting, sharing and watching more of our videos This is Manish from RebellionRider.com ♥ I LOVE ALL MY VIEWERS AND SUBSCRIBERS
Views: 5320 Manish Sharma
Resourse Busy demo.mp4
 
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Demo on 11g parameter ddl_lock_timeout parameter
03 Dead Lock in oracle database
 
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DML Locks DML locks or data locks guarantee the integrity of data being accessed concurrently by multiple users. DML locks help to prevent damage caused by interference from simultaneous conflicting DML or DDL operations. By default, DML statements acquire both table-level locks and row-level locks. The reference for each type of lock or lock mode is the abbreviation used in the Locks Monitor from Oracle Enterprise Manager (OEM). For example, OEM might display TM for any table lock within Oracle rather than show an indicator for the mode of table lock (RS or SRX). Row Locks (TX) Row-level locks serve a primary function to prevent multiple transactions from modifying the same row. Whenever a transaction needs to modify a row, a row lock is acquired by Oracle. There is no hard limit on the exact number of row locks held by a statement or transaction. Also, unlike other database platforms, Oracle will never escalate a lock from the row level to a coarser granular level. This row locking ability provides the DBA with the finest granular level of locking possible and, as such, provides the best possible data concurrency and performance for transactions. The mixing of multiple concurrency levels of control and row level locking means that users face contention for data only whenever the same rows are accessed at the same time. Furthermore, readers of data will never have to wait for writers of the same data rows. Writers of data are not required to wait for readers of these same data rows except in the case of when a SELECT... FOR UPDATE is used. Writers will only wait on other writers if they try to update the same rows at the same point in time. In a few special cases, readers of data may need to wait for writers of the same data. For example, concerning certain unique issues with pending transactions in distributed database environments with Oracle. Transactions will acquire exclusive row locks for individual rows that are using modified INSERT, UPDATE, and DELETE statements and also for the SELECT with the FOR UPDATE clause. Modified rows are always locked in exclusive mode with Oracle so that other transactions do not modify the row until the transaction which holds the lock issues a commit or is rolled back. In the event that the Oracle database transaction does fail to complete successfully due to an instance failure, then Oracle database block level recovery will make a row available before the entire transaction is recovered. The Oracle database provides the mechanism by which row locks acquire automatically for the DML statements mentioned above. Whenever a transaction obtains row locks for a row, it also acquires a table lock for the corresponding table. Table locks prevent conflicts with DDL operations that would cause an override of data changes in the current transaction. Table Locks (TM) What are table locks in Oracle? Table locks perform concurrency control for simultaneous DDL operations so that a table is not dropped in the middle of a DML operation, for example. When Oracle issues a DDL or DML statement on a table, a table lock is then acquired. As a rule, table locks do not affect concurrency of DML operations. Locks can be acquired at both the table and sub-partition level with partitioned tables in Oracle. A transaction acquires a table lock when a table is modified in the following DML statements: INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE, SELECT with the FOR UPDATE clause, and LOCK TABLE. These DML operations require table locks for two purposes: to reserve DML access to the table on behalf of a transaction and to prevent DDL operations that would conflict with the transaction. Any table lock prevents the acquisition of an exclusive DDL lock on the same table, and thereby prevents DDL operations that require such locks. For example, a table cannot be altered or dropped if an uncommitted transaction holds a table lock for it. A table lock can be held in any of several modes: row share (RS), row exclusive (RX), share (S), share row exclusive (SRX), and exclusive (X). The restrictiveness of a table lock's mode determines the modes in which other table locks on the same table can be obtained and held.
Views: 224 OnLinE ReSoUrCe
Taking your Teradata Database to the Next Level
 
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Watch this 10 minute Teradata video to see how ER/Studio can help you: Use ALTER scripts to make modifications to a Teradata database; Leverage MLPPI to improve the performance of certain queries and high-volume insert, update and delete operations; and Manage your historical data with temporal data types. Download a FREE trial of ER/Studio: https://www.idera.com/er-studio-enterprise-data-modeling-and-architecture-tools/freetrialsubscriptionform?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=producttrial&utm_content=ERtrial_teradata_YT
Views: 249 IDERA Software
Bean's Look-a-Likes | Clip Compilation | Mr. Bean Official Cartoon
 
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Wait a minute, that's not Mr. Bean! This is a clip compilation of Bean's encouters with his look a likes. Stay tuned: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkAGrHCLFmlK3H2kd6isipg?sub_confirmation=1 Welcome to the official Mr Bean Channel. Here you will find all of your favourite Mr Bean moments from the classic series with Rowan Atkinson and his new animated adventures. Make sure to subscribe and never miss a Full Episode of Mr Bean, or Mr Bean Compilations and clips as well as originals including Mr Bean Comics. To find out more about Mr Bean visit: Mr Bean on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/mrbean Follow us on Twitter http://www.twitter.com/mrbean More Mr. Bean https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLC1EDzqtkrh_Zj67UUTZZmRfrgqwyZNlW
Views: 156433 Mr Bean
Point Sublime: Refused Blood Transfusion / Thief Has Change of Heart / New Year's Eve Show
 
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Clifford Charles "Cliff" Arquette (December 27, 1905 -- September 23, 1974) was an American actor and comedian, famous for his TV role as Charley Weaver. Arquette was born in Toledo, Ohio, the son of Winifred (née Clark) and Charles Augustus Arquette, a vaudevillian. He was the patriarch of the Arquette show business family, which became famous because of him. Arquette was the father of the late actor Lewis Arquette and the grandfather of actors Patricia, Rosanna, Alexis (originally Robert), Richmond, and David Arquette. He was a night club pianist, later joining the Henry Halstead orchestra in 1923. Arquette had been a busy, yet not nationally known, performer in radio, theatre, and motion pictures until 1956, when he retired from show business. At one time, he was credited with performing in 13 different daily radio shows at different stations in the Chicago market, getting from one studio to the other by way of motorboats along the Chicago River through its downtown. One such radio series he performed on was The Adventures of Wild Bill Hickok Arquette and Dave Willock had their own radio show, Dave and Charley, in the early 1950s as well as a television show by the same name that was on the air for three months. Arquette performed on the shows as Charley Weaver. The story that Arquette later told about his big break was that one night in the late 1950s he was watching The Tonight Show. Host Jack Paar happened to ask the rhetorical question, "Whatever became of Cliff Arquette?" That startled Arquette so much that, "I almost dropped my Scotch!" In 1959, Arquette accepted Paar's invitation to perform on Paar's NBC Tonight Show. Arquette depicted the character of "Charley Weaver, the wild old man from Mount Idy." He would bring along, and read, a letter from his "Mamma" back home. This characterization proved so popular that Arquette almost never again appeared in public as himself, but nearly always as Charley Weaver, complete with his squashed hat, little round glasses, rumpled shirt, broad tie, baggy pants, and suspenders. Although a good number of Arquette's jokes appear 'dated' now (and, arguably, even back then), he could still often convulse Paar and the audience into helpless laughter by way of his timing and use of double entendres in describing the misadventures of his fictional family and townspeople. As Paar noted, in his foreword to Arquette's first Charley Weaver book: "Sometimes his jokes are old, and I live in the constant fear that the audience will beat him to the punch line, but they never have. And I suspect that if they ever do, he will rewrite the ending on the spot. I would not like to say that all his jokes are old, although some have been found carved in stone. What I want to say is that in a free-for-all ad lib session, Charley Weaver has and will beat the fastest gun alive." Arquette, as Charley Weaver, hosted Charley Weaver's Hobby Lobby on ABC from September 30, 1959 to March 23, 1960. Arquette also appeared as Charley Weaver on the short-lived The Roy Rogers and Dale Evans Show on ABC from September 29 to December 29, 1962. Arquette was also a frequent guest on NBC's The Ford Show, Starring Tennessee Ernie Ford, the short-lived The Dennis Day Show in the 1953-1954 season, and on The Jack Paar Show after Paar left The Tonight Show. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cliff_Arquette
Views: 46770 Remember This
OpenMP
 
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OpenMP (Open Multi-Processing) is an API that supports multi-platform shared memory multiprocessing programming in C, C++, and Fortran, on most processor architectures and operating systems, including Solaris, AIX, HP-UX, Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows platforms. It consists of a set of compiler directives, library routines, and environment variables that influence run-time behavior. OpenMP is managed by the nonprofit technology consortium OpenMP Architecture Review Board (or OpenMP ARB), jointly defined by a group of major computer hardware and software vendors, including AMD, IBM, Intel, Cray, HP, Fujitsu, Nvidia, NEC, Red Hat, Texas Instruments, Oracle Corporation, and more. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 760 Audiopedia
The Great Gildersleeve: Leroy's Paper Route / Marjorie's Girlfriend Visits / Hiccups
 
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The Great Gildersleeve (1941--1957), initially written by Leonard Lewis Levinson, was one of broadcast history's earliest spin-off programs. Built around Throckmorton Philharmonic Gildersleeve, a character who had been a staple on the classic radio situation comedy Fibber McGee and Molly, first introduced on Oct. 3, 1939, ep. #216. The Great Gildersleeve enjoyed its greatest success in the 1940s. Actor Harold Peary played the character during its transition from the parent show into the spin-off and later in a quartet of feature films released at the height of the show's popularity. On Fibber McGee and Molly, Peary's Gildersleeve was a pompous windbag who became a consistent McGee nemesis. "You're a haa-aa-aa-aard man, McGee!" became a Gildersleeve catchphrase. The character was given several conflicting first names on Fibber McGee and Molly, and on one episode his middle name was revealed as Philharmonic. Gildy admits as much at the end of "Gildersleeve's Diary" on the Fibber McGee and Molly series (Oct. 22, 1940). Premiering on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGees' Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-law's estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy Forester (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie. Curiously, while Gildersleeve had occasionally spoken of his (never-present) wife in some Fibber episodes, in his own series the character was a confirmed bachelor. In a striking forerunner to such later television hits as Bachelor Father and Family Affair, both of which are centered on well-to-do uncles taking in their deceased siblings' children, Gildersleeve was a bachelor raising two children while, at first, administering a girdle manufacturing company ("If you want a better corset, of course, it's a Gildersleeve") and then for the bulk of the show's run, serving as Summerfield's water commissioner, between time with the ladies and nights with the boys. The Great Gildersleeve may have been the first broadcast show to be centered on a single parent balancing child-rearing, work, and a social life, done with taste and genuine wit, often at the expense of Gildersleeve's now slightly understated pomposity. Many of the original episodes were co-written by John Whedon, father of Tom Whedon (who wrote The Golden Girls), and grandfather of Deadwood scripter Zack Whedon and Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog). The key to the show was Peary, whose booming voice and facility with moans, groans, laughs, shudders and inflection was as close to body language and facial suggestion as a voice could get. Peary was so effective, and Gildersleeve became so familiar a character, that he was referenced and satirized periodically in other comedies and in a few cartoons. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Gildersleeve
Views: 207668 Remember This
Calling All Cars: Invitation to Murder / Bank Bandits and Bullets / Burglar Charges Collect
 
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The Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) is the police department of the city of Los Angeles, California. The LAPD has been copiously fictionalized in numerous movies, novels and television shows throughout its history. The department has also been associated with a number of controversies, mainly concerned with racial animosity, police brutality and police corruption. The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
Views: 32542 Remember This

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