Home
Search results “Philip micklin aral sea”
Philip Micklin – Desiccation of the Aral Sea: A Water Management Disaster of the Soviet Union
 
01:10:36
Recorded June 29, 2010 Philip Micklin — Department of Geography, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI -- This interdisciplinary 3-day institute will explore global water issues, including those that affect the Great Lakes region. Daily topics addressed will include: water scarcity, effective water management, and water issues in politics, sanitation, agriculture, and economics. Faculty and staff from the University of Chicago and other educational institutions from around the world will speak each day, interspersed with discussions of K-12 curriculum development. Intended primarily for elementary through community college educators (but open to all interested parties), the Institute will address each theme through a series of presentations and group discussions. Attendees will receive suggested instructional resources for curriculum building and K-12 lessons aligned to Illinois State Standards will be developed based on presentations made at the Institute. This internationally focused conference is presented by The University of Chicago’s Center for International Studies, Program on the Global Environment, Center for East Asian Studies, Southern Asian Language and Area Center, Center for East European and Russian Eurasian Studies, Center for Middle Eastern Studies, and Center for Latin American Studies.
Views: 350 UChicagoCISSR
The Shrinking Aral Sea Has Been Reduced To A Mere Sliver
 
01:09
NASA’s Terra satellite documented the slowly shrinking Aral Sea over the course of the past fourteen years starting in 2000. The Aral Sea in Central Asia used to be the fourth largest land locked body of water in the world with its tributary rivers the Syr Darya and the Amu Darya. After being irrigated and diminished by drought, the eastern basin of the Southern Sea has dried up for the first time in an estimated 600 years. NASA’s Terra satellite documented the slowly shrinking sea over the course of the past fourteen years starting in 2000. Philip Micklin, a geographer emeritus from Western Michigan University and an expert on the Aral Sea is quoted as saying: "This part of the Aral Sea is showing major year-to-year variations that are dependent on flow of Amu Darya. I would expect this pattern to continue for some time." During the 1950s and 60s the Soviet Union irrigated the two tributary rivers of the lake for agriculture, which significantly lowered the water level, splitting the water into two parts known as the South Aral Sea in the country of Uzbekistan, and the North Aral Sea located in Kazakhstan. Over the years, the water level has continued to go up and down depending on the precipitation in the area and run off carried by the tributary rivers.
Views: 10980 SpaceTee Vee
The Aral Sea and Uzbekistan
 
46:23
The Aral Sea - the history of a declining water body and water management in Uzbekistan today. Lecture at Geocentrum, Uppsala University on 2nd December 2014 organized by The Swedish Aral Sea Society and The Baltic University Programmne. Speakers: Dr. Abror N. Gadaev, Professor of Water Supply, Waste Water and Water Resources Department, Samarkand State Architectural and Civil Engineering Institute,Samarkand, Uzbekistan. Dr. Rustam Eshniyazov, Chairman at the Faculty of Natural Sciences, Karakalpak State University, Nukus, Uzbekistan. Time Length: 46 minutes
How Does An Entire Sea Virtually Vanish? (2001)
 
13:18
The Shrinking Aral Sea (2001) - Diversion of rivers to feed cotton plantations has led Uzbekistan's Aral Sea to all but disappear - with disastrous consequences for those living nearby. Subscribe to Journeyman here: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=journeymanpictures For 50 years Soviet leaders diverted the rivers which feed the sea to irrigate cotton. And when it became clear that the land wasn't suited for the thirsty crop the planners simply increased the use of hazardous chemicals. "It is the world's largest man- made environmental disaster", says Ian Small for Medecins Sans Frontieres in Uzbekistan. The charity usually operates in war zones, but for the first time it has now set up a project devoted solely to an environmental catastrophe. The war here is against tuberculosis, kidney disease and cancers which plague the people of the region. Some are caused by toxins, some by the high levels of salt in the water. All could have been avoided. For more information, visit https://www.journeyman.tv/film/1036 Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/journeymanpictures Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/JourneymanNews https://twitter.com/JourneymanVOD Follow us on Instagram: https://instagram.com/journeymanpictures ABC Australia – Ref. 1036
Views: 5497 Journeyman Pictures
Aral Sea Crisis
 
05:22
This video presents crisis on Aral Sea and possible solutions to this problem. Created by: Bekzat Akhmetkaiyr Olzhas Sergaziyev Zhandos Alzhanov For Course: Survey of Environmental Sciences for non-science Majors
Views: 162 Bekzat Akhmetkaiyr
Aral Sea disaster
 
12:41
Prepared by: Tleuzhan Sharipullayev Sanzhar Amanzholov Nurbolat Gabassov Danen Dossaibek
Aral sea
 
01:22
Qaraqalpaqstan
Pernicious Chain Events The Aral Sea Disaster
 
03:43
Aral Sea Disaster-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/join -- Create animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 49 Marielle Gutierrez
About The Aral Sea
 
03:56
Yusup Kamalov (Karakalpakstan, Uzbekistan). An expert on the Aral Sea problem speaks about the Aral Sea importance in the region.
The Aral Sea
 
02:21
William, Chris, and Sergio
Views: 71 Cuda-
Aral Sea Catastrophe
 
05:11
Views: 63 ecososbb
Aquatic Biodiversty:  The Changing Shape Of Our Planet
 
01:19
Aquatic Biodiversty: The Changing Shape Of Our Planet Aquatic biodiversity is important to the health and well-being of our planet, but is being threatened at an increasing rate. It is affected by many variables, including irrigation, contamination, and evaporation. Irrigation Irrigation is, possibly, the most subtle threat to aquatic biodiversity. Until recently, most irrigation issues were considered strictly from an engineering standpoint, with little regard to how construction and maintenance of irrigation channels would affect aquatic biodiversity. body of water's aquatic biodiversity The channels were just earthworks, with no seepage protection. Over time, seepage affects a body of water's aquatic biodiversity by changing its composition, affecting all life in or sustained by it. Contamination of the body of water In the past, lakes were often used as dumping grounds for waste materials. These materials are ingested by native animal and plant life, directly affecting aquatic biodiversity by killing off entire species. According to Philip Micklin and Nikolay V. Aladin's article in the Scientific American, over the last thirty years animal life has decreased as follows: Fish species, from 32 to 6; bird species, from 319 to 160; and mammal species, from 70 to 32. Evaporation If rate of evaporation exceeds rate of rainfall, snowmelt, or groundwater supply, aquatic biodiversity is threatened. volume decreases When a body of water's volume decreases (transforming the area into first a marsh, then dry ground, then eventually a desert) aquatic biodiversity changes as well. Micklin and Aladin state that the Aral Sea has actually suffered sufficient evaporation that it split into two smaller bodies, the Small and Large Aral Seas. Large Aral Sea The Large Aral Sea split again, into a deep western basin, a shallow eastern basin, and an isolated gulf. None are as deep as the original body of water and damage has been done to both plant and animal sectors. They further note that the marshland has decreased from 100,000 hectares in 1960 to 15,000 hectares in the 1990s. percentage of salinity Second, the percentage of salinity (the ratio of salt to water) can rise. Two of the smaller bodies are no longer habitable largely due to this aspect. According to Micklin and Aladin, the salinity of the Large Aral Sea has risen from about 14 grams per liter (g/l) to over 100. ocean's salinity A typical ocean's salinity is about 53 g/l, so this is devastating. What were once lush expanses of plant life sustained by the lake's water are now barren except for the few varieties able to thrive in either saline soil, dry conditions or both. aquatic biodiversity If damage was restricted to this one body of water, the threat to aquatic biodiversity would not necessarily be world-threatening. The problem (exceedingly costly to fix once the damage has begun), however, is spreading. The latest victims are Central Africa's Lake Chad and California's Salton Sea. survival Unfortunately, even economically fortunate countries are cautious in allocating funds for remedying the problems. Unless ways can be found to help smaller countries, where immediate survival is often more urgent than long-term effects, we can expect these changes to continue, with disastrous effects.
Views: 266 DefineBiodiversity
Will Micklin Addresses UN on World Conference Recommendations
 
06:13
The President of the UN General Assembly convened a meeting June 3, 2014, of states and indigenous peoples to receive input for the concise, action-oriented document that will result from the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples. Will Mcklin, 1st Vice President, Central Council of Tlingit Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska, made this statement consistent with the views of at least 150 indigenous nations and organizations.
Homework #1: Disparities of Health| Aral Sea Disaster
 
03:08
This video displays the determinants of health using the aral sea tragedy and the film the hospital at the end of the world.
Views: 114 school account
Aral Sea | Wikipedia audio article
 
34:49
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Aral Sea Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= The Aral Sea () was an endorheic lake (one with no outflow) lying between Kazakhstan (Aktobe and Kyzylorda Regions) in the north and Uzbekistan (Karakalpakstan autonomous region) in the south. The name roughly translates as "Sea of Islands", referring to over 1,100 islands that had dotted its waters; in the Turkic languages aral means "island, archipelago". The Aral Sea drainage basin encompasses Uzbekistan and parts of Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Afghanistan and Iran.Formerly the fourth-largest lake in the world with an area of 68,000 km2 (26,300 sq mi), the Aral Sea has been shrinking since the 1960s after the rivers that fed it were diverted by Soviet irrigation projects. By 1997, it had declined to 10% of its original size, splitting into four lakes – the North Aral Sea, the eastern and western basins of the once far larger South Aral Sea, and one smaller intermediate lake. By 2009, the southeastern lake had disappeared and the southwestern lake had retreated to a thin strip at the western edge of the former southern sea; in subsequent years, occasional water flows have led to the southeastern lake sometimes being replenished to a small degree. Satellite images taken by NASA in August 2014 revealed that for the first time in modern history the eastern basin of the Aral Sea had completely dried up. The eastern basin is now called the Aralkum Desert. In an ongoing effort in Kazakhstan to save and replenish the North Aral Sea, a dam project was completed in 2005; in 2008, the water level in this lake had risen by 12 m (39 ft) compared to 2003. Salinity has dropped, and fish are again found in sufficient numbers for some fishing to be viable. The maximum depth of the North Aral Sea is 42 m (138 ft) (as of 2008).The shrinking of the Aral Sea has been called "one of the planet's worst environmental disasters". The region's once-prosperous fishing industry has been essentially destroyed, bringing unemployment and economic hardship. The water from the diverted Syr Darya river is used to irrigate about 5 million acres (2 million hectares) of farmland in the Ferghana Valley. The Aral Sea region is also heavily polluted, with consequential serious public health problems. UNESCO added the historical documents concerning the development of the Aral Sea to its Memory of the World Register as a unique resource to study this "environmental tragedy".
Views: 58 wikipedia tts
SBTG: Alexander Pearl "The (Next) Big Short: Our Water Crisis"
 
33:21
Alexander Pearl is an Assistant Professor of Law at Texas Tech University and is the Director for Center Law and Policy. Professor Pearl dived into his lecture discussing The Big Short, a film about the housing crisis in 2007-2008. Professor Pearl fears that the next big short could be our water crisis. With the population increasing the need for more water also increases. Pearl discussed that the proposed solutions for our water scarcity issue is to make more water. He explains that this is problematic because of the changing climate and it is not a sustainable solution because we cannot keep depleting from the aquifer, we need to conserve. Pearl also discussed problems with property law with water in Texas and the jurisdictional challenges to the water problem. In conclusion, Alex explains that we need to learn how to conserve our water and use it more efficiently or we could have a water crisis.
Ghost Ship of The Desert
 
01:10:05
The story of Charley Clusker's search for the Lost Ship of the Desert. These ships are a relic from a bygone age, when the Aral Sea in Uzbekistan was a rich area teeming with fish and providing a bustling trade for the surrounding . Abandoned Old Ships In Desert. Shipwrecks On Beach Found. Ghost Haunted Ship Wrecks Amazing collection of abandoned rusty ships in desert. Abandoned . Breaking News: Yes my friends many mysterious lost ships found in the sand of the California's Colorado Desert kind of strange. Music & Video by Didier .
Views: 304 Sheri Dixon
CK2 Multiplayer: Hording the Sun w/J2JonJeremy Part 28
 
21:31
I am joined by fellow hobbyist J2JonJeremy as we attempt carve realms of our own from Central Asia! I am playing as the Yabguids around the Aral Sea, while he is playing as the Zunists in Afghanistan. Can we survive our nearby enemies? ---------------------------------------------- Watch J2JonJeremy's perspective from his channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/J2JonJeremy Watch the full playlist for this series: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1Be_cMfHOEdxjGnQG6y8XfnrRL55_tJB ---------------------------------------------- Additional Crusader Kings II Playlists: Chronicles of Prydain: http://bit.ly/29StQod Rajas of India: http://bit.ly/29MenU9 Pax Romana: http://bit.ly/29Dx669 Republic of Manaw: http://bit.ly/29K7RjC The West Saxons (Conclave): http://bit.ly/2bAtpOG After the End mod w/J2JonJeremy: http://bit.ly/2a4pcjL Russian Tribal (Reaper's Due): http://bit.ly/2dZps56 Smash the Patriarchy: http://bit.ly/2mKcgbL --------------------------------------------- Enjoying the series? Please consider leaving a like and/or a comment, as that helps the video return higher in search results. Want to help more directly? Consider supporting me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/AuldDragon Twitter: http://twitter.com/AuldDragon Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/AuldDragon Discord: http://discord.gg/dmVenBA
Views: 209 aulddragon
Water and Agriculture - Panel Discussion and Q&A
 
50:02
Recorded June 28, 2010 Fred Pearce — Freelance author and journalist Pamela Martin — Assistant Professor in Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago Marty Matlock — Professor of Ecological Engineering in the Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering at the University of Arkansas - Fayetteville, and Area Director, Division of Agriculture for Agricultural and Rural Sustainability -- This interdisciplinary 3-day institute will explore global water issues, including those that affect the Great Lakes region. Daily topics addressed will include: water scarcity, effective water management, and water issues in politics, sanitation, agriculture, and economics. Faculty and staff from the University of Chicago and other educational institutions from around the world will speak each day, interspersed with discussions of K-12 curriculum development. Intended primarily for elementary through community college educators (but open to all interested parties), the Institute will address each theme through a series of presentations and group discussions. Attendees will receive suggested instructional resources for curriculum building and K-12 lessons aligned to Illinois State Standards will be developed based on presentations made at the Institute. This internationally focused conference is presented by The University of Chicago’s Center for International Studies, Program on the Global Environment, Center for East Asian Studies, Southern Asian Language and Area Center, Center for East European and Russian Eurasian Studies, Center for Middle Eastern Studies, and Center for Latin American Studies.
Views: 24 UChicagoCISSR